Jeopardy definition

jĕpər-dē
Frequency:
Risk of loss or injury; peril or danger.
noun
10
2
Great danger; peril.

To have one's life in jeopardy.

noun
5
3
(law) A defendant's risk or danger of conviction when put on trial.
noun
3
1
Jeopardy is defined as danger or risk.

An example of jeopardy is risking your life when confronting a burglar in your house.

noun
1
0
Jeopardy is the registered trademark owned by Jeopardy Productions for a popular U.S. television game show where contestants are shown answers and must then ask the correct question.

An example of Jeopardy is playing the game with categories like “Potent Potables.”

noun
1
0
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(law) Exposure to conviction and punishment; situation of an accused person on trial for a crime.
noun
1
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A defendant’s risk of punishment.
noun
1
0

The poor condition of the vehicle put its occupants in constant jeopardy.

noun
1
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Jeopardy!, a popular US television game show in which contestants answer clues by responding in the form of a question, hosted originally by Art Fleming and most notably by Alex Trebek.
pronoun
1
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
jeopardy
Plural:
jeopardies

Origin of jeopardy

  • Middle English juperti from Old French jeu parti even game, uncertainty jeu game (from Latin iocus joke, game yek- in Indo-European roots) parti past participle of partir to divide (from Latin partīre) (from pars part- part part)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English jepardie, from Old French jeu parti (“a divided game, i.e. an even game, an even chance”), from Medieval Latin iocus partītus (“an even chance, an alternative”), from Latin iocus (“jest, play, game”) + partītus, perfect passive participle of partiō (“divide”); see joke and party.

    From Wiktionary

  • Coined when Ed Vane, a skeptical producer, rejected an earlier concept of the show, claiming “it doesn’t have enough jeopardies”, according to creator Merv Griffin.

    From Wiktionary