Security meaning

sĭ-kyo͝orĭ-tē
Frequency:
Security is defined as being free from danger, or feeling safe.

An example of security is when you are at home with the doors locked and you feel safe.

noun
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Freedom from doubt, anxiety, or fear; confidence.
noun
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Freedom from risk or danger; safety.
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One who undertakes to fulfill the obligation of another; a surety.
noun
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Something deposited or given as assurance of the fulfillment of an obligation; collateral.
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An organization or department whose task is protection or safety, esp. a private police force hired to patrol or guard a building, park, or other area.

If you see an intruder, call security.

noun
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Something that gives or assures safety, tranquillity, certainty, etc.; protection; safeguard.
noun
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A type of investment instrument that represents either an ownership interest in a company or evidence of debt. Stocks, bonds, mutual funds, variable annuities, and investment contracts all are types of securities. A few other types of securities include debentures, futures, puts, calls, warrants, and mineral rights. Insurance policies and fixed annuities typically are not securities. The term security is precisely defined in the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as well as through case law.
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Of, designating, or serving as security.

Security precautions, security guard.

adjective
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Safety; the condition of being protected against harm.
noun
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In telecommunications, protection of system and network resources from external attack or internal subversion, thereby ensuring that those resources are available only to those who have the legitimate right to use them and, further, to ensure that they are used only for legitimate purposes. Security encompasses the following dimensions.
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(uncountable) The condition of not being threatened, especially physically, psychologically, emotionally, or financially.
noun
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(countable) Something that secures.
noun
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An organization or department responsible for providing security by enforcing laws, rules, and regulations as well as maintaining order.
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(law) Something that secures the fulfillment of an obligation or law.
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(law) Freedom from apprehension.
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(finance) Property etc. temporarily relinquished to guarantee repayment of a loan.
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noun
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Something that gives or assures safety, as:
  • A group or department of private guards.
    Call building security if a visitor acts suspicious.
  • Measures adopted by a government to prevent espionage, sabotage, or attack.
  • Measures adopted, as by a business or homeowner, to prevent a crime such as burglary or assault.
    Security was lax at the firm's smaller plant.
  • Measures adopted to prevent escape.
    Security in the prison is very tight.
noun
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A financial instrument, such as a stock or bond, representing rights of ownership or creditorship and often traded in secondary markets.
noun
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Any evidence of debt or ownership; esp., a stock certificate or bond.
noun
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An umbrella term for the protection of electronic data and networks. In the IT world, security comprises authorization (who has access?), authentication (is this "really" the authorized user?), encryption (scrambling data for privacy), malware protection (avoiding destructive infiltration), as well as backup and disaster recovery (assurance against failure). See security suite, computer security, information security, security audit, security protocol, access control, authentication, cryptography, malware, backup and disaster recovery.
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Collateral given or promised to guarantee the repayment of a debt.
noun
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(finance) Proof of ownership of stocks, bonds or other investment instruments.
noun
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The state of being or feeling secure; freedom from fear, anxiety, danger, doubt, etc.; state or sense of safety or certainty.
noun
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See CompTIA.
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A document that is evidence of ownership in a corporation (for example, a stock or share), or a creditor’s being owed money by a corporation or government (for example, a bond).
noun
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Having protection from one’s adversaries, particularly from those who would do harm—intentionally, or otherwise, to property or to a person. Information Technology security issues include but are not limited to authentication, critical infrastructure protection, disaster recovery, intrusion detection and network management, malicious code software protection, physical security of networks, security policies, the sharing of rights and directories, and wireless security. Security breaches occur daily, with some of them making media headlines and embarrassing the targeted companies or agencies. On January 30, 2005, for example, a security incident occurred that brought considerable embarrassment to the Dutch armed forces. About 75 pages of highly classified documents about human traffickers from the computers of the Dutch Royal Marechaussee (the armed forces contingency that guards the Dutch borders) somehow found their way to the controversial weblog Geen Stijl (meaning “No Style”). The conjecture is that a Dutch armed forces staffer worked on the documents at home and unwittingly shared the contents of his computer’s hard drive to numerous others when he logged onto KaZaA—which is unsecure. This was not the first time that the Dutch have made media headlines over computer security issues. In 2004, the Dutch public prosecutor’s office was equally embarrassed after it was publicized that the prosecutor threw his old PC into the trash, making available for public scrutiny his hard drive with hundreds of pages of classified data on high-profile Dutch crimes—as well as his own credit card numbers and personal tax file information. As a result, the prosecutor resigned from his job. Estala, A. Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6). The Next Generation. [Online, March 9, 1999.] Geocities.com Website. http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/ Foothills/7626/defin.html; Grami, A. and Schell, B. Future Trends in Mobile Commerce: Service Offerings, Technological Advances and Security Challenges. Proceedings of Second Annual Conference on Privacy, Security and Trust. University of New Brunswick, New Brunswick, Canada, October 13–15, 2004. [Online, October 2004.] Privacy, Security, Trust 2004 Website. http:// www.unb.ca/pstnet/pst2004/; Lehtovirta, J. Transition from IPv4 to IPv6. [Online, 2004.] Tascomm Engineering Oy Website. http://www.tascomm.fi/~jlv/ngtrans/; Libbenga, J. Classified Dutch Military Documents Found on P2P Site. [Online, January 30, 2005.] Reg SETI Group Website. http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/01/30/dutch_classified_info_found_on_kazaa/.
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Origin of security

  • Middle English securite from Old French from Latin sēcūritās from sēcūrus secure secure

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English securite, from Old French (French: sécurité), from Latin securitas, from Latin securus "safe, secure".

    From Wiktionary