Danger definition

dānjər
Frequency:
Liability to injury, damage, loss, or pain; peril.

To live in constant danger.

noun
10
4
A source or an instance of risk or peril.
noun
9
3
(obsolete) Power, especially power to harm.
noun
10
5
A thing that may cause injury, pain, etc.
noun
6
2
Danger is defined as a possibility that something harmful or unpleasant will happen, or a person or thing that causes harm.

When you are alone in a bad neighborhood late at night, this is an example of a time when you are in danger.

A drunk driver is an example of a danger.

noun
6
3
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Exposure or vulnerability to harm or risk.
noun
8
7
(obs.) Power of a lord, esp. to harm.
noun
3
2
(obsolete) To imperil; to endanger.
verb
3
2
Exposure to liable harm.

"Danger is a good teacher, and makes apt scholars" (William Hazlitt, Table talk).

noun
2
1
(obsolete) To claim liability.
verb
2
1
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Mischief.

"We put a Sting in him, / That at his will he may doe danger with" (Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, 2:1:17).

noun
1
0
(obsolete) To run the risk.
verb
1
0
An instance or cause of liable harm.

"Two territorial questions..unsettled..each of which was a positive danger to the peace of Europe" (Times, 5 Sept. 3/2).

noun
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
danger
Plural:
dangers

Origin of danger

  • Middle English daunger power, dominion, peril from Old French dangier from Vulgar Latin dominiārium authority, power from Latin dominium sovereignty from dominus lord, master dem- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English daunger (“power, dominion, peril”), from Anglo-Norman dangier, from Old French dangier, alteration of Old French dongier (due to association with Latin damnum (“damage”)) from Vulgar Latin *domniārium (“authority, power”) from Latin dominus (“lord, master”).

    From Wiktionary