Immunity definition

ĭ-myo͝onĭ-tē
Frequency:
(immunology) Inherited, acquired, or induced resistance to infection by a specific pathogen.
noun
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The quality or condition of being immune.
noun
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The protection of the body from a disease caused by an infectious agent, such as a bacterium or virus. Immunity may be natural (that is, inherited) or acquired.
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Resistance to or protection against a specified disease; power to resist infection, esp. as a result of antibody formation.
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(immunology) Inherited, acquired, or induced resistance to infection by a specific pathogen.
noun
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Immunity is defined as being able to resist a disease or medical condition or the freedom from punishment.

An example of immunity is having a resistance to getting the flu because you have had a flu shot.

An example of immunity is the freedom of not being punished for a crime because a person agreed to testify for the prosecutor.

noun
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Exemption or freedom from something burdensome or otherwise unpleasant; specif., legal exemption as from criminal prosecution or civil suit.

A foreign ambassador with diplomatic immunity.

noun
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Exemption from certain generally applicable requirements of law or from certain liabilities, granted to special groups of people to facilitate the performance of their public functions.

Diplomatic immunity; judicial immunity.

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Exemption from prosecution granted to a witness to compel him or her to give potentially self-incriminating testimony that otherwise could not be compelled because of the constitutional right against self-incrimination.
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Exemption from being sued.

Sovereign immunity; charitable immunity.

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An exemption from a duty or penalty.
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A permanent status, as for a diplomat, exempting one from being sued or prosecuted for certain actions.
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A special status, granted by a prosecutor, exempting a witness from being prosecuted for the acts to which he or she testifies.
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The doctrine (subject to certain exceptions) that a government may not be sued in its own courts or in courts of another nation or level of government; many limitations on this doctrine apply and vary from state to state. Sometimes referred to as governmental immunity.
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A grant of immunity to a witness by a prosecutor that exempts the witness from being prosecuted for the acts about which the witness will testify.
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A grant of immunity to a witness by a prosecutor, under which the prosecutor promises not to use the witness’ testimony against him or her, but reserves the right to prosecute the witness for the underlying action.
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(uncountable) The state of being insusceptible to something; notably:
  • (medicine) Fully protective resistance against infection.
    Some people have better immunity to diseases than others.
  • (law) An exemption from specified duties, such as payments or services.
    Feudal privileges often included tax and other immunities.
  • (law) An exemption from prosecution.
    The prosecutor offered the lieutenant immunity for all the crimes he would testify having known to be planned by the elusive drug baron.
  • (in games and competitions) An exemption given to a player from losing or being withdrawn from play.
    After winning the last round the player was granted immunity which allowed him to stay in the game even after receiving the least amount of points.
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(countable) A resistance to a specific thing.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
immunity
Plural:
immunities

Origin of immunity

  • From Old French immunité, from Latin immunitas, in the legal sense; for the medical use see immunization.

    From Wiktionary