Scuttle meaning

skŭtl
To scrap or abandon (a plan, undertaking, etc.)
verb
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To scuttle means to sink a ship by making holes in the hull, or to abandon a plan.

An example of scuttle is to put holes in a ship with cannon fire.

An example of scuttle is to stop developing plans for creating a garden.

verb
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The definition of a scuttle is a hatch or opening in a wall, roof or boat, with a cover.

An example of a scuttle is the round opening on the deck of a sailboat.

noun
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A small opening or hatch with a movable lid in the deck or hull of a ship or in the roof, wall, or floor of a building.
noun
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To thwart, ruin, or terminate.
verb
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A metal pail for carrying coal.
noun
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A shallow open basket for carrying vegetables, flowers, or grain.
noun
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To run or move with short hurried movements; scurry.
verb
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A hurried run.
noun
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A broad, open basket for carrying grain, vegetables, etc.
noun
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A kind of bucket, usually with a wide lip, used for pouring coal on a fire.
noun
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To run or move quickly; scurry, esp. away from danger, trouble, etc.
verb
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A scurry or scamper; hasty flight.
noun
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An opening in a wall or roof, fitted with a lid or cover.
noun
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A small, covered opening in the hull or deck of a ship.
noun
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The lid or cover for any such opening.
noun
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To sink (a ship or boat) intentionally by making holes in the hull below the waterline or by opening seacocks.
verb
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A container like an open bucket (usually to hold and carry coal).
noun
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(construction) A hatch that provides access to the roof from the interior of a building.
noun
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A broad, shallow basket.
noun
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A small hatch or opening in a boat. Also, small opening in a boat or ship for draining water from open deck.
noun
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(nautical) To cut a hole or holes through the bottom, deck, or sides of (as of a ship), for any purpose.
verb
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To deliberately sink one's ship or boat by any means, usually by order of the vessel's commander or owner.
verb
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(by extension, in figurative use) Undermine or thwart oneself (sometimes intentionally), or denigrate or destroy one's position or property; compare scupper.

The candidate had scuttled his chances with his unhinged outburst.

verb
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(intransitive) To move hastily, to scurry.
verb
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A quick pace; a short run.

noun
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To scuttle is to move quickly, especially away from something dangerous.

An example of scuttle is for a crab to walk sideways away from a person.

verb
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Scuttle is defined as a bucket for coal.

An example of a scuttle is the metal pail wide a wide lip used to pour coal in a train car.

noun
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The lid or hatch of such an opening.
noun
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1

Origin of scuttle

  • Middle English scutel basket from Old English dish from Latin scutella scullery

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English skottell from Old French escoutille possibly from Spanish escotilla

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English scottlen possibly akin to scud

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old English scutel (“dish, platter"), from Latin scutella, diminutive form of Latin scutra (“flat tray, dish"), perhapes related to Latin scutum (“shield"); compare Dutch schotel and German Schüssel.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle French (> French écoutille), from Old Norse skaut (“corner of a cloth, of a sail"), akin to Gothic 𐍃𐌺𐌰𐌿𐍄𐍃 (skauts, “projecting edge, fringe"), German Schoß.

    From Wiktionary

  • See scuddle.

    From Wiktionary