Presume meaning

prĭ-zo͝om'
Presume is defined as to assume to be true without proof, or to dare to do something without permission.

An example of presume is to believe in heaven even if there is no proof.

An example of presume is to speak for another person without his or her knowledge or permission.

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To take for granted as being true in the absence of proof to the contrary.
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To constitute reasonable evidence for assuming; appear to prove.

A signed hotel bill presumes occupancy of a room.

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To take for granted that something is true or factual; make a supposition.
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To act presumptuously or take unwarranted advantage of something.

Don't presume on their hospitality.

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To take upon oneself without permission or authority; dare (to say or do something); venture.
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To take for granted; accept as true, lacking proof to the contrary; suppose.
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To constitute reasonable evidence for supposing.

A signed invoice presumes receipt of goods.

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To act presumptuously; take liberties.
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To rely too much (on or upon), as in taking liberties.

To presume on another's friendship.

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To take something for granted.
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(now rare) To perform, do (something) without authority; to lay claim to without permission. [from 14th c.]

Don't make the decision yourself and presume too much.

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With infinitive object: to be so presumptuous as (to do something) without proper authority or permission. [from 14th c.]

I wouldn't presume to tell him how to do his job.

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To assume to be true (without proof); to take for granted, to suppose. [from 14th c.]
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(intransitive) To be presumptuous; with on, upon, to take advantage (of), to take liberties (with). [from 15th c.]
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To venture without authority or permission; dare.

He presumed to invite himself to dinner.

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Origin of presume

  • Middle English presumen from Old French presumer from Late Latin praesūmere from Latin to anticipate prae- pre- sūmere to take em- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Anglo-Norman presumer, Middle French presumer, and their source, Latin praesÅ«mere (“to take beforehand, anticipate"), from prae- + sÅ«mere (“to take").
    From Wiktionary