Leave meaning

lēv
To go out of or away from.

Not allowed to leave the room.

verb
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The definition of leave is to depart, or to let something alone, or to bequeath.

When you exit a room, this is an example of when you leave the room.

When you don't bother someone, this is an example of when you leave him alone.

When you give money to your children in your will, this is an example of when you leave them money.

verb
3
1
Leave is defined as permission, or is time off from work.

When you are given permission to attend a party, this is an example of when you are given leave to attend.

When you take two months off work to care for your new baby, this is an example of maternity leave.

noun
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To give over to another to control or act on.

Leave all the details to us.

verb
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An act of departing; a farewell.

Took leave of her with a heavy heart.

noun
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Permission.
noun
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(nonstandard) To allow or permit; let.
verb
2
1
To put forth foliage; leaf.
verb
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To cause or allow to be or remain in a specified state.

Left the lights on.

verb
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1
(dated) Farewell, departure.

I took my leave of the gentleman without a backward glance.

noun
1
1
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To have as a result, consequence, or remainder.

The car left a trail of exhaust fumes. Two from eight leaves six.

verb
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To set out or depart; go.

When can you leave?

verb
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Permission to do something.
noun
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To cause or allow to remain; not take away.

To leave some of the food for latecomers.

verb
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To have remaining after one.

The deceased leaves a widow.

verb
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To bequeath.

To leave a fortune to charity.

verb
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To let be in the care of; entrust.

To leave a decision to another.

verb
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To give as a remainder by subtraction.

Ten minus two leaves eight.

verb
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To reject.

Take it or leave it.

verb
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To go away from.

To leave the house.

verb
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To let stay or cause to be in a certain condition.

The flood left them homeless.

verb
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To give up; abandon; forsake.
verb
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To stop living in, working for, or belonging to.
verb
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To go away, depart, or set out.
verb
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To put forth, or bear, leaves; leaf.
verb
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To have a consequence or remnant.
  • To cause or allow (something) to remain as available; to refrain from taking (something) away; to stop short of consuming or otherwise depleting (something) entirely.
    I left my car at home and took a bus to work.
    The ants did not leave so much as a crumb of bread.
    There's not much food left. We'd better go to the shops.
  • To cause, to result in.
    The lightning left her dazzled for several minutes.
    Infantile paralysis left him lame for the rest of his life.
  • To put; to place; to deposit; to deliver, with a sense of withdrawing oneself.
    Leave your hat in the hall.
    I left my sewing and went to the window to watch the falling snow.
    We should leave the legal matters to lawyers.
verb
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To depart; to separate from.
  • To let be or do without interference.
    I left him to his reflections.
    I leave my hearers to judge.
  • To depart from; to end one's connection or affiliation with.
    I left the country and I left my wife.
  • To end one's membership in (a group); to terminate one's affiliation with (an organization); to stop participating in (a project).
    I left the band.
  • (intransitive) To depart; to go away from a certain place or state.
    I think you'd better leave.
verb
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To transfer something.
  • To transfer possession of after death.
    When my father died, he left me the house.
  • To give (something) to someone; to deliver (something) to a repository; to deposit.
    I'll leave the car in the station so you can pick it up there.
  • To transfer responsibility or attention of (something) (to someone); to stop being concerned with.
    Can't we just leave this to the experts?.
verb
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(archaic) To stop, desist from; to "leave off" (+ noun / gerund).
verb
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(cricket) The action of the batsman not attempting to play at the ball.
noun
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(billiards) The arrangement of balls in play that remains after a shot is made (which determines whether the next shooter "” who may be either the same player, or an opponent "” has good options, or only poor ones).
noun
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Permission to be absent; time away from one's work.

I've been given three weeks' leave by my boss.

noun
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(dated or law) Permission.

Might I beg leave to accompany you?

The applicant now seeks leave to appeal and, if leave be granted, to appeal against these sentences.

noun
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To give leave to; allow; permit; let; grant.
verb
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(intransitive, rare) To produce leaves or foliage.
verb
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(obsolete) To raise; to levy.
verb
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To make, place, deposit, etc., and cause to remain behind one.

To leave one's calling card.

verb
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1
leave
  • To refrain from disturbing or interfering.
idiom
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leave no stone unturned
  • To make every possible effort.
idiom
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leave alone
  • see the phrase under alone
idiom
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leave off
  • to stop; cease
  • to stop doing, using, or wearing
idiom
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leave out
  • to omit
  • to ignore
idiom
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leave well enough alone
  • see the phrase under alone
idiom
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beg leave
  • to ask permission
idiom
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by your leave
  • with your permission
  • an apology or a request for permission
    He left abruptly, without so much as a by your leave.
idiom
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on leave
  • absent from duty with permission
idiom
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0
take leave of
  • to say goodbye to
idiom
0
0
take one's leave
  • to go away; depart
idiom
0
0

Origin of leave

  • Middle English leve from Old English lēafe dative and accusative of lēaf leubh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English leaven from Old English lǣfan leip- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English leaven from leaf leaf leaf

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English leven, from Old English lÇ£fan (“to leave"), from Proto-Germanic *laibijanÄ… (“to let stay, leave"), causative of Proto-Germanic *lÄ«banÄ… (“to stay, remain"). Cognate with Old Frisian lÄ“va (“to leave"), Old Saxon lÄ“vian, Old High German leiban (“to leave"), Old Norse leifa (“leave over") (whence Icelandic leifa), lifna (“to be left") (whence Danish levne). More at lave, belive.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English leve, from Old English lÄ“af (“permission, privilege"), from Proto-Germanic *laubō, *laubÄ… (“permission, privilege, favour, worth"), from Proto-Indo-European *leubÊ°- (“to love, hold dear"). Cognate with obsolete German Laube (“permission"), Swedish lov (“permission"), Icelandic leyfi (“permission"). Related to Dutch verlof, German Erlaubnis. See also love.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English leven, from Old English lÄ«efan (“to allow, grant, concede; believe, trust, confide in"), from Proto-Germanic *laubijanÄ… (“to allow, praise"), from Proto-Indo-European *leubÊ°- (“to love, hold dear"). Cognate with German lauben (“to allow, believe"), Icelandic leyfa (“to allow").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English leven, from lef (“leaf"). More at leaf.

    From Wiktionary

  • See levy.

    From Wiktionary