Leave Definition

lēv
leaved, leaves, leaving, left
verb
leaves, leaving, left
To put forth, or bear, leaves; leaf.
Webster's New World
To go without taking or removing.
Left my book on the bus.
American Heritage
To cause or allow to remain; not take away.
To leave some of the food for latecomers.
Webster's New World
To omit or exclude.
Left out the funniest part of the story.
American Heritage
To go away from.
To leave the house.
Webster's New World
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noun
leaves
Permission.
Webster's New World
Permission to be absent from duty or work, esp. such permission given to personnel in the armed services.
Webster's New World
An act of departing; a farewell.
Took leave of her with a heavy heart.
American Heritage
The period for which such permission is granted.
Webster's New World
Leave is defined as permission, or is time off from work.
When you are given permission to attend a party, this is an example of when you are given leave to attend.
When you take two months off work to care for your new baby, this is an example of maternity leave.
YourDictionary
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idiom
leave
  • To refrain from disturbing or interfering.
American Heritage
leave no stone unturned
  • To make every possible effort.
American Heritage
leave alone
  • see the phrase under alone
Webster's New World
leave off
  • to stop; cease
  • to stop doing, using, or wearing
Webster's New World
leave out
  • to omit
  • to ignore
Webster's New World
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Other Word Forms of Leave

Noun

Singular:
leave
Plural:
leaves

Origin of Leave

  • From Middle English leven, from Old English lÇ£fan (“to leave"), from Proto-Germanic *laibijanÄ… (“to let stay, leave"), causative of Proto-Germanic *lÄ«banÄ… (“to stay, remain"). Cognate with Old Frisian lÄ“va (“to leave"), Old Saxon lÄ“vian, Old High German leiban (“to leave"), Old Norse leifa (“leave over") (whence Icelandic leifa), lifna (“to be left") (whence Danish levne). More at lave, belive.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English leve, from Old English lÄ“af (“permission, privilege"), from Proto-Germanic *laubō, *laubÄ… (“permission, privilege, favour, worth"), from Proto-Indo-European *leubÊ°- (“to love, hold dear"). Cognate with obsolete German Laube (“permission"), Swedish lov (“permission"), Icelandic leyfi (“permission"). Related to Dutch verlof, German Erlaubnis. See also love.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English leven, from Old English lÄ«efan (“to allow, grant, concede; believe, trust, confide in"), from Proto-Germanic *laubijanÄ… (“to allow, praise"), from Proto-Indo-European *leubÊ°- (“to love, hold dear"). Cognate with German lauben (“to allow, believe"), Icelandic leyfa (“to allow").

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English leve from Old English lēafe dative and accusative of lēaf leubh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English leaven from Old English lǣfan leip- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English leven, from lef (“leaf"). More at leaf.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English leaven from leaf leaf leaf

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • See levy.

    From Wiktionary

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