Love meaning

lŭv
The definition of love is a feeling of deep affection, passion or strong liking for a person or thing.
noun
165
33
Agape - Means love in modern day Greek, but in ancient times referred to a pure love without sexual connotations.
noun
82
27
Another word related to love, "lubere" or "libere," comes to us from the Romans. This Latin word means 'to please'.
noun
74
22
In all words related to the word love, roots relating to dear, pleasing, and cherished may be found, hinting at the deeper transcendent meaning of the modern word.
noun
56
13
To feel love or sexual love for another.
verb
53
20
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Love is defined as to show or have deep attraction, affection or emotional attachment to a person, people or thing.

An example of love is showering someone with kisses.

An example of love is greeting a good friend with a big hug.

An example of love is watching an amazing dancer dance.

verb
23
3
To feel love for (a person).

We love our parents. I love my friends.

verb
22
3
A strong feeling of affection and concern toward another person, as that arising from kinship or close friendship.
noun
21
4
Comes from the Middle English word luf, derived from the Old English word "lufu." This is akin to Old High German, "luba," and another Old English word, lēof, which means ‘dear’.
noun
18
9
A deep and tender feeling of affection for or attachment or devotion to a person or persons.
noun
17
5
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A strong feeling of affection and concern for another person accompanied by sexual attraction.
noun
15
5
An expression of one's love or affection.

Give Mary my love.

noun
12
1
A strong feeling of affection and concern toward another person, as that arising from kinship or close friendship.
noun
11
1
To feel sexual love for (a person).
verb
11
8
To like or desire enthusiastically.

Loves swimming.

verb
10
1
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A feeling of brotherhood and good will toward other people.
noun
10
1
(sports) A score of zero, as in tennis.
noun
9
1
(uncountable) Strong affection.
  • An intense feeling of affection and care towards another person.
    A mother's love is not easily shaken.
  • A deep or abiding liking for something.
    My love of cricket knows no bounds.
  • A profound and caring attraction towards someone.
    Your love is the most important thing in my life.
noun
9
1
Xenia - Includes hospitality, and refers to a type of love most would consider charity or giving.

An example of love is what a mother feels when looking at her sleeping baby.

An example of love is what a husband feels when his wife winks at him from across the room.

An example of love is what friends feel when sharing a beautiful moment together.

An example of love is among family members; familial love, or love based on kinship ties.

An example of love is love of neighbor, based on the Christian teaching of expressing concern and charity for all people.

An example of love is love of country, or patriotism.

An example of love is love of God, or expressive love for a deity or deities.

noun
9
2
An intense emotional attachment to something, as to a pet or treasured object.
noun
9
2
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To have an intense emotional attachment to.
verb
9
2
To show love for by embracing, fondling, kissing, etc.
verb
9
5
To feel love for.
verb
7
2
To have a strong affection for.

I love my spouse; I love you.

verb
7
2
To care deeply about, to be dedicated to.
verb
7
2
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To feel love for a person.

We love our parents. I love my friends.

verb
6
3
To need, thrive on.

Mold loves moist, dark places.

verb
5
1
(euphemistic) A sexual desire; sexual activity.
noun
5
3
(euphemistic) To have sex with, (perhaps from make love.)

I wish I could love her all night long.

verb
5
3
To delight in; take pleasure in.

To love books.

verb
5
5
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An expression of one's affection.

Send him my love.

noun
4
1
(colloquial) A term of friendly address, regardless of feelings.

Hello, love, how can I help you?

noun
4
1
To derive delight from a fact or situation.

I love the fact that the coffee shop now offers fat-free chai latte.

verb
4
1
anagrams
4
1
To feel sexual love for someone.
verb
4
4
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(obsolete or UK dialectal) To praise; commend.
verb
3
1
To gain benefit from.

A plant that loves shade.

verb
3
2
(countable) The object of one's romantic feelings; a darling or sweetheart.

I met my love by the gasworks wall.

noun
3
2
A climbing plant, Clematis vitalba.
noun
3
2
(colloquial) To be strongly inclined towards something; an emphatic form of like.

I love walking barefoot on wet grass; I'd love to join the team; I love what you've done with your hair.

verb
3
2
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(racquet sports) Zero, no score.

So that's fifteen-love to Kournikova.

noun
3
2
An unincorporated community in Kentucky.
pronoun
2
3
To feel the emotion of love; be in love.
verb
2
4
An intense emotional attachment to something, as to a pet or treasured object.
noun
1
3
(mythology) Eros or Cupid.
noun
1
3
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To have an intense emotional attachment to.

Loves his house.

verb
1
3
To thrive on; need.

The cactus loves hot, dry air.

verb
1
3
(tennis) A score of zero.
noun
1
3
pronoun
1
3
Eros - Includes passionate love full of desire and longing.
noun
1
4
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Philia - Mentioned by Aristotle, meant a dispassionate, virtuous and unselfish love.
noun
1
4
Used as the closing, before the signature, of a letter, especially between good friends or family members, or by the young.
noun
1
4
(obsolete or UK dialectal) To praise as of value; prize; set a price on.
verb
1
4
Voël.
anagrams
1
4
To lust for.
verb
1
5
A strong feeling of affection and concern for another person accompanied by sexual attraction.
noun
1
7
for love
  • Out of compassion; with no thought for a reward:
    She volunteers at the hospital for love.
idiom
1
1
for love or money
  • Under any circumstances. Usually used in negative sentences:
    I would not do that for love or money.
idiom
1
1
for the love of
  • For the sake of; in consideration for:
    Did it all for the love of praise.
idiom
1
2
in love
  • Deeply or passionately enamored:
    A young couple in love.
  • Highly or immoderately fond:
    In love with Japanese painting; in love with the sound of her own voice.
idiom
1
1
no love lost
  • No affection; animosity:
    There's no love lost between them.
idiom
1
1
fall in love (with)
  • to begin to feel love, esp. romantic love, (for)
idiom
2
1
for love
  • as a favor or for pleasure; without payment
idiom
1
1
for the love of
  • for the sake of; with loving regard for
  • a mild exclamation of surprise, exasperation, etc., used in the phrases for the love of God (or Christ, Pete, etc.)
idiom
2
1
in love (with)
  • feeling love, esp. romantic love, (for); enamored (of)
idiom
1
1
make love
  • to woo; court
  • to embrace, kiss, etc. as lovers do
  • to have sexual intercourse
idiom
1
4
no love lost between
  • no liking or affection existing between
idiom
1
1
not for love or money
  • not under any conditions
idiom
1
1

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

for love
fall in love (with)
for love
no love lost between
not for love or money

Origin of love

  • Middle English from Old English lufu leubh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English love, luve, from Old English lufu (“love, affection, desire"), from Proto-Germanic *lubō (“love"), from Proto-Indo-European *lewbÊ°-, *leubÊ°- (“love, care, desire"). Cognate with Old Frisian luve (“love"), Old High German luba (“love"). Related to Old English lÄ“of (“dear, beloved"), lÄ«efan (“to allow, approve of"), Latin libet, lubō (“to please") and Albanian lyp (“to beg, ask insistently"), lips (“to be demanded, needed"), Serbo-Croatian ljubiti, ljubav, Russian любовь (ljubovʹ), любить (ljubitʹ).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English loven, lovien, from Old English lofian (“to praise, exalt, appraise, value"), from Proto-Germanic *lubōnÄ… (“to praise, vow"), from *lubÄ… (“praise"), from Proto-Indo-European *leubÊ°- (“to like, love, desire"), *lewbÊ°-. Cognate with Scots love, lofe (“to praise, honour, esteem"), Dutch loven (“to praise"), German loben (“to praise"), Swedish lova (“to promise, pledge"), Icelandic lofa (“to promise"). See also lofe.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English loven, lovien, from Old English lufian (“to love, cherish, sow love to; fondle, caress; delight in, approve, practice"), from the noun lufu (“love"). See above. Compare West Frisian leavje (“to love"), German lieben (“to love").

    From Wiktionary

  • The previously held belief that it originated from the French term l'Å“uf (“the egg"), due to its shape, is no longer widely accepted.

    From Wiktionary

  • The closing-of-a-letter sense is presumably a truncation of With love or the like.

    From Wiktionary

  • From the phrase Neither for love nor for money, meaning "nothing".

    From Wiktionary