Hate meaning

hāt
To hate is defined as to feel strong and intense aversion or dislike.

An example of hate is the feeling you experience towards someone who has done something horribly unkind to you.

verb
22
3
A strong feeling of dislike or ill will; hatred.
noun
13
2
Intense animosity or dislike; hatred.
noun
12
4
To have strong dislike or ill will for; loathe; despise.
verb
8
2
To feel hatred.
verb
8
4
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The definition of hate is a feeling of intense dislike or aversion.

An example of hate is what you feel towards someone who has just robbed you and destroyed your house.

noun
1
1
To feel strong dislike for or hostility toward.

Rivals who hate each other.

verb
1
1
To feel dislike or distaste for.

Hates washing dishes; hates to get up early.

verb
1
1
To be disinclined (to do something) out of politeness or a need to apologize.

I hate to interrupt, but can I ask you a quick question?

verb
1
1
To dislike or wish to avoid; have a strong aversion to.

To hate arguments.

verb
1
1
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To feel hatred.
verb
1
1
A person or thing hated.
noun
1
1
Based on, expressing, or characterized by hatred, esp. hatred of a particular race, religion, etc.

A hate group, a piece of hate mail.

adjective
1
1
To dislike intensely or greatly.

I hate men who take advantage of women.

verb
1
1
(slang) To dislike intensely due to envy.

Don't be hating my weave, girl, you're just jealous!

verb
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1
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He gave me a look filled with pure hate.

noun
1
1
An object of hatred.

One of my pet hates is traffic wardens.

noun
1
2
(Internet, colloquial) Negative feedback, abusive behaviour.

There was a lot of hate in the comments on my vlog about Justin Beiber from his fans.

noun
0
0
(slang) hate on (someone)
  • To ridicule, insult, or act hatefully toward:
    Stop hating on them—they're my friends.
idiom
1
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

hate on (someone)

Origin of hate

  • Middle English haten from Old English hatian N., Middle English from Old English hete

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English haten, from Old English hatian (“to hate, treat as an enemy”), from Proto-Germanic *hatōną (“to hate”), from Proto-Germanic *hataz (“hatred, hate”), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱād- (“strong emotion”). Cognate with Dutch haten, German hassen, Swedish hata, French haïr (a Germanic borrowing).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old English hete, from Proto-Germanic *hataz. Cognate with West Frisian haat, Dutch haat, German Hass, Swedish hat.

    From Wiktionary