Desire meaning

dĭ-zīr
Desire is defined as physically longing for something.

An example of desire is the feeling before a goodnight kiss.

noun
24
5
To want to have sex with (another person).
verb
18
14
To ask for; request.
verb
17
3
To have or feel a desire.
verb
12
4
To want; to wish for earnestly.

I desire to speak with you.

verb
9
4
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(countable) Someone or something wished for.

It is my desire to speak with you.

You’re my heart’s desire.

noun
3
1
(uncountable) Strong attraction, particularly romantic or sexual.

His desire for her kept him awake at night.

noun
3
1
To want emotionally or sexually.

She has desired him since they first met.

verb
3
3
The definition of desire is to wish for or crave something.

An example of desire is to really want a piece of chocolate cake.

verb
3
5
(uncountable) The feeling of desire.

Too much desire can seriously affect one’s judgment.

noun
2
2
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An object of such feeling or passion.

A quiet evening with you is my only desire.

noun
2
3
Sexual appetite; lust.
noun
2
3
To want sexually.
verb
1
2
A strong wish or craving.
noun
1
2
To put a request to (someone); to entreat.
verb
1
2
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To express a wish for; to entreat; to request.
verb
1
2
To require; to demand; to claim.
verb
1
2
(uncountable) Motivation.
noun
1
2
To express a wish for; request.
verb
1
3
Sexual appetite; passion.
noun
1
3
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To wish or long for; want.

A reporter who desires an interview; a teen who desires to travel.

verb
1
4
anagrams
0
1
A request or petition.
noun
0
2
To wish or long for; crave; covet.
verb
0
2
An asking for something; request.
noun
0
2
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A thing or person desired.
noun
0
2
To miss; to regret.
verb
0
2
anagrams
0
2
A female given name, spelling variant of Désirée.
pronoun
0
3

Origin of desire

  • Middle English desiren from Old French desirer from Latin dēsīderāre to observe or feel the absence of, miss, desire dē- de- -sīderāre (as in cōnsīderāre to observe attentively, contemplate consider)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English desiren, from Old French desir(r)er, from Latin desidero (“to long for, desire, feel the want of, miss, regret”), apparently from de- + sidus (in the phrase de sidere, "from the stars") in connection with astrological hopes. Compare consider. Compare also desiderate.

    From Wiktionary