Leer meaning

lîr

A leer stomach.

adjective
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The definition of a leer is a long glance showing malicious intent.

An example of a leer is a glare at someone right before you steal some of their belongings.

noun
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Leer is defined as to look with a sneaky expression.

An example of leer is to glare at something infuriating.

verb
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To look with a sidelong glance, indicative especially of sexual desire or sly and malicious intent.
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A desirous, sly, or knowing look.
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A sly, sidelong look showing salaciousness, malicious triumph, etc.
noun
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To look with a leer.
verb
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(intransitive) To look sideways or obliquely; now especially with sexual desire or malicious intent.
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To entice with a leer or leers.
verb
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A significant side glance; a glance expressive of some passion, as malignity, amorousness, etc.; a sly or lecherous look.
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An arch or affected glance or cast of countenance.
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(UK dialectal) The flank or loin.
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adjective
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Faint from lack of food; hungry.
adjective
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(UK dialectal) Thin; faint.
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Having no load or burden; free; without a rider.

A leer horse.

adjective
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Lacking sense or seriousness; trifling; frivolous.

Leer words.

adjective
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To teach.
verb
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To learn.
verb
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Alternative form of lehr.
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Origin of leer

  • Probably from obsolete leer cheek from Middle English ler from Old English hlēor kleu- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English ler, leor (“face, cheek"), from Old English hlÄ“or (“face, cheek, profile"), from Proto-Germanic *hleuzÄ… (“ear, cheek"), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlews- (“temple of the forehead, cheek"), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlewe-, *ḱlew- (“to hear"). Cognate with Scots lire, lere (“face, appearance, complexion, blee"), Dutch lier (“cheek"), Swedish lyra (“pout"), Norwegian lia (“hillside"), Icelandic hlýr (“the face, cheek, countenance"). Related to Old English hlyst (“sense of hearing, listening") and hlysnan (“to listen"). More at list, listen.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English leren, from Old English lÇ£ran (“to teach, instruct, guide, enjoin, advise, persuade, urge, preach, hand down"), from Proto-Germanic *laizijanÄ… (“to teach"), from Proto-Indo-European *leis- (“track, footprint, furrow, trace"). Cognate with Dutch leren (“to teach"), German lehren (“to teach"), Swedish lära (“to teach"). Related to Old English lār (“lore, learning, science, art of teaching, preaching, doctrine, study, precept, exhortation, advice, instigation, history, story, cunning "). See lore.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English lere, from Old English Ä¡elÇ£re, *lÇ£re (“empty, void, empty-handed"), from Proto-Germanic *lÄ“ziz, *lÄ“zijaz (“empty"), from Proto-Indo-European *les- (“to collect, pick"). Cognate with Dutch laar (“a clearing in the woods"), German leer (“empty"). Related to Old English lesan (“to gather, collect"). More at lease.
    From Wiktionary
  • Exact development uncertain, but apparently from *leer (“to make a face"), from leer (“face"). See below.
    From Wiktionary
  • See lehr
    From Wiktionary