Lease definition

lēs
The term or duration of such a contract.
noun
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The definition of lease is to rent property out to someone or to agree to rent someone else's property.

An example of lease is when you rent your apartment out to a tenant.

An example of lease is when you decide to rent an apartment to live in.

verb
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To grant use or occupation of under the terms of a contract.
verb
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A contract by which one party (landlord, or lessor) gives to another (tenant, or lessee) the use and possession of lands, buildings, property, etc. for a specified time and for fixed payments.
noun
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The property that is leased.
noun
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To get by a lease; take a lease on.
verb
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Lease in which tenant pays a rental amount for property, plus additional obligations for utilities, taxes, etc.
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A contract granting use or occupation of property during a specified period in exchange for a specified rent or other form of payment.
noun
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A temporary transfer of ownership of an asset, such as real estate or a car, for a set period of time. Regular monthly payments are due on the lease and the lessee is responsible for any maintenance or upkeep expenses. At the end of the lease period, the property reverts back to the owner. However, the lessee may have an option to buy the property at the end of the contract period. Leases often enable a company or individual to have the use of the equipment or property for a significantly lower cost than an outright acquisition. A lease also has the benefit of allowing the lessee to use the most up-to-date equipment or property that is available while avoiding any of the market risk that comes with ownership.
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An agreement in which the right of occupancy or use of real property, or the right to use personal property, is conveyed to another for a set period of time in return for consideration, typically in the form of periodic payments.
noun
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Lease in which a tenant pays a flat sum inclusive of all utilities and other expenses.
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Rental of property without a long term contractual obligation; in actuality, not a lease. May require one month’s notice in order to terminate, depending on local or state law.
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Oral agreement for tenancy; see parol.
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Business lease agreement whereby the amount to be paid is based on a specified percentage of tenant’s gross or net profits; usually a minimum rental amount is stated.
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An agreement under which the lessee of real property conveys his rights, or some subset of them, to a third party.
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(chiefly dialectal) To gather.
verb
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(chiefly dialectal) To pick, select, pick out; to pick up.
verb
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(chiefly dialectal) To glean.
verb
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(intransitive, chiefly dialectal) To glean, gather up leavings.

verb
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adjective
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noun
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(intransitive, UK dialectal) To tell lies; tell lies about; slander; calumniate.
verb
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An open pasture or common.
noun
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(UK dialectal) To release; let go; unloose.
verb
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To operate or live in some property or land through purchasing a long-term contract (leasehold) from the owner (freeholder).
verb
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To take or hold by lease.
verb
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(intransitive) To grant a lease; to let or rent.
verb
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A contract granting use or occupation of property during a specified period in exchange for a specified rent.
noun
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The period of such a contract.
noun
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A leasehold.
noun
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The place at which the warp-threads cross on a loom.
noun
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To give by a lease; let.
verb
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Lease is defined as a legal document in which the terms of an agreement are set out for a person to use someone else's property for a specific period of time.

An example of a lease is the contract under which you agree to rent an apartment for a period of time for a specific amount of money each month.

noun
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To get or hold by such a contract.
verb
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The period of time for which such a contract is in force.

A two-year lease.

noun
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a new lease on life
  • An opportunity to improve one's circumstances or outlook.
idiom
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new lease on life
  • another chance to lead a happy life, be successful, etc. because of a new turn of events
idiom
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Alternative Forms

Alternative Form of lease - leaze

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

a new lease on life

Origin of lease

  • Middle English les from Anglo-Norman from lesser to lease variant of Old French laissier to let go from Latin laxāre to loosen from laxus loose slēg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English lesen, from Old English lesan (“to collect, pick, select, gather"), from Proto-Germanic *lesanÄ… (“to gather"), from Proto-Indo-European *les- (“to gather"). Cognate with Scots lease (“to arrange, gather"), West Frisian lêze (“to read"), Eastern Frisian lesen (“to gather, read"), Dutch lezen (“to gather, read"), German lesen (“to gather, read"), Danish læse (“to collect, read").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English lesen, from Old English lÄ«esan (“to loosen, release, redeem, deliver, liberate"), from Proto-Germanic *lausijanÄ… (“to release, loosen"), from Proto-Indo-European *leu- (“to cut, solve, separate"). Cognate with Dutch lozen (“to drain, discharge"), German lösen (“to release"), Swedish lösa (“to solve"), Icelandic leysa (“to solve").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English *lesen, from Anglo-Norman *leser, Old French lesser, laisier (“to let, let go"), from Medieval Latin lassō (“to let, let go"), partly from Latin laxō (“to loose"); partly from Old High German lāzzan, lāzan (German lassen, “to let, let go, release"). Cognate with Old English lÇ£tan (“to allow, let go, leave, rent"). More at let.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English leas, lees, les, from Old English lÄ“as (“false, void, loose"), from Proto-Germanic *lausaz (“loose, free"), from Proto-Indo-European *lÅ«- (“to untie, set free, sever"). Cognate with German los (“loose"), Swedish lös (“loose"). More at loose.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English lese, from Old English lÇ£s (“meadow"), from Proto-Germanic *lÄ“swō (“meadow"), from Proto-Indo-European *lÄ“y-, *lÄ“id- (“to leave, let"). Cognate with Old Saxon lÄ“sa (“meadow"). See also leasow.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English *leasien, from Old English lÄ“asian (“to lie, tell lies"), from lÄ“as (“falsehood, lying, untruth, mistake").

    From Wiktionary

  • From leash

    From Wiktionary