Leash meaning

lēsh
The definition of a leash is a cord that holds an animal.

An example of a leash is a device for walking a dog.

noun
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To restrain with or as if with a leash.
verb
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A cord, strap, etc. by which a dog or other animal is held in check.
noun
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A set of three, as of hounds; brace and a half.
noun
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To attach a leash to.
verb
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To check or control by or as by a leash.
verb
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A strap, cord or rope with which to restrain an animal, often a dog.
noun
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A brace and a half; a tierce.
noun
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A set of three; three creatures of any kind, especially greyhounds, foxes, bucks, and hares; hence, the number three in general.
noun
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A string with a loop at the end for lifting warp threads, in a loom.
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(surfing) A leg rope.

1980: Probably the idea was around before that, but the first photo of the leash in action was published that year "” As Years Roll By (1970's Retrospective), Drew Kampion, Surfing magazine, February 1980, page 43. Quoted at surfresearch.com.au glossary.

noun
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To fasten or secure with a leash.
verb
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(figuratively) To curb, restrain.
verb
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Leash is defined as to attach a cord to or to control with a cord.

An example of leash is to put a dog on a cord or strap for walking down the street.

verb
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hold in leash
  • To control; curb; restrain.
idiom
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strain at the leash
  • To be impatient to have freedom from restraint.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

hold in leash
strain at the leash

Origin of leash

  • Middle English lees, lesh from Old French laisse from laissier to let go lease

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English leesshe, leysche, lesshe, a variant of more original lease, from Middle English lees, leese, leece, lese, from Old French lesse (modern French laisse), from Latin laxa (“thong, a loose cord"), feminine form of laxus (“loose"); compare lax.

    From Wiktionary