Chain meaning

chān
The definition of a chain is a series of objects, people or events which are connected to one another, or a flexible series of metal links.

An example of a chain is a link of DNA.

An example of a chain is a series of connected metal links used to contain a dog in a yard.

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A series of chemically bonded atoms, especially carbon atoms, which may be arranged in an open, branched, or cyclic structure.
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A series of closely linked or connected things.

A chain of coincidences.

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A range of mountains.
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Chain is defined as to fasten, secure or confine.

An example of to chain is to handcuff someone.

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A restraining or confining agent or force.
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A number of establishments, such as stores, theaters, or hotels, under common ownership or management.
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To bind or make fast with a chain or chains.

Chained the dog to a tree.

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To restrain or confine as if with chains.

Workers who were chained to a life of dull routine.

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A flexible series of joined links, usually of metal, used to pull, confine, etc. or to transmit power.
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Any chainlike ornament, badge, etc.
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A chainlike measuring instrument, or its measure of length.
  • A surveyor's (or Gunter's) chain (66 feet or 20.117 meters or 100 links).
  • An engineer's chain (100 feet or 30.48 meters or 100 links).
  • A chain 10 yards in length, used to measure for a first down.
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A series of things connected causally, logically, physically, etc.

Chain of events, mountain chain.

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A number of stores, restaurants, etc. owned by one company, specif., such a group of franchised businesses having the same name.
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A linkage of atoms in a molecule.
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To fasten or shackle with chains.
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To hold down, restrain, confine, etc.
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1906-79; Brit. biochemist, born in Germany.
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A group of atoms, often of the same element, bound together in a line, branched line, or ring to form a molecule. &diamf3; In a straight chain , each of the constituent atoms is attached to other single atoms, not to groups of atoms. &diamf3; In a branched chain , side groups are attached to the chain. &diamf3; In a closed chain , the atoms are arranged in the shape of a ring.
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A series of interconnected rings or links usually made of metal.

He wore a gold chain around the neck.

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A series of interconnected things.

A chain of mountains.

A chain of ideas, one leading to the next.

This led to an unfortunate chain of events.

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A series of stores or businesses with the same brand name.

That chain of restaurants is expanding into our town.

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A number of atoms in a series, which combine to form a molecule.

When examined, the molecular chain included oxygen and hydrogen.

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(surveying) A series of interconnected links of known length, used as a measuring device.
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(surveying) A long measuring tape.
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A unit of length equal to 22 yards. The length of a Gunter's surveying chain. The length of a cricket pitch. Equal to 20.12 metres. Equal to 4 rods. Equal to 100 links.
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(mathematics, order theory) A totally ordered set, especially a totally ordered subset of a poset.
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(UK) A sequence of linked house purchases, each of which is dependent on the preceding and succeeding purchase (said to be "broken" if a buyer or seller pulls out).
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That which confines, fetters, or secures; a bond.

The chains of habit.

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(nautical, in the plural) Iron links bolted to the side of a vessel to bold the dead-eyes connected with the shrouds; also, the channels.
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(weaving) The warp threads of a web.

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To fasten something with a chain.
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(intransitive) To link multiple items together.
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To secure someone with fetters.
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To obstruct the mouth of a river etc with a chain.
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(computing) To relate data items with a chain of pointers.
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(computing) To be chained to another data item.
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To measure a distance using a 66-foot long chain, as in land surveying.
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(computing, rare, associated with Acorn Computers) To load and automatically run (a program).
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pull
  • To take unfair advantage of someone; deceive or manipulate someone.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of chain

  • Middle English chaine from Old French from Latin catēna

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English chaine, from Old French chaine, chaene ("chain"; Modern French: chaîne), from Latin catēna (“chain”), from Proto-Indo-European *kat- (“to braid, twist; hut, shed”). Cognate with North Frisian ketten (“chain”), Dutch keten (“chain”), Low German Kede (“chain”), German Kette (“chain”), Danish kæde (“chain”), Swedish kedja (“chain”), Icelandic keðja (“chain”).

    From Wiktionary