Tie meaning

A necktie.
noun
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Tie means to fasten or bind two or more things together with string or rope or to make a knot or bow.

An example of to tie is making a bow with shoelaces.

verb
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To fasten or secure with or as if with a cord, rope, or strap.

Tied the kite to a post; tie up a bundle.

verb
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To fasten by drawing together the parts or sides and knotting with strings or laces.

Tied her shoes.

verb
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To confine or restrict as if with cord.

Duties that tied him to the office.

verb
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A beam or rod that joins parts and gives support.
noun
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One of the timbers or slabs of concrete laid across a railroad bed to support the rails.
noun
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A curved line above or below two notes of the same pitch, indicating that the tone is to be sustained for their combined duration.
noun
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To fasten, connect, join, or bind in any way.

Tied together by common interests.

verb
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To confine; restrain; restrict.
verb
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To connect with a tie.
verb
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To be capable of being tied; make a tie.
verb
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To make an equal score or achievement, as in a contest.
verb
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A string, lace, cord, etc. used to tie things.
noun
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Something that connects, binds, or joins; bond; link.

A business tie, ties of affection.

noun
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noun
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A beam, rod, etc. that connects parts of a building and prevents them from spreading apart.
noun
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Any of the parallel crossbeams to which the rails of a railroad are fastened.
noun
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Low shoes fastened with laces, as oxfords.
noun
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A curved line above or below two notes of the same pitch, indicating that the tone is to be held unbroken for the duration of their combined values.
noun
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That has been tied, or made equal.

A tie score.

adjective
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The definition of a tie is something that connects or bonds two or more people or things together.

An example of a tie is two people being blood-related.

noun
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A cord, string, or other means by which something is tied.
noun
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To bring together in relationship; connect or unite.

Friends who were tied by common interests; people who are tied by blood or marriage.

verb
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To join (notes) by a tie.
verb
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To be fastened or attached.

The apron ties at the back.

verb
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To achieve equal scores in a contest.
verb
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Something that connects or unites; a link.

A blood tie; marital ties.

noun
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To fasten, attach, or bind together or to something else, as with string, cord, or rope made secure by knotting, etc.

To tie someone's hands, to tie a boat to a pier.

verb
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Something that confines, limits, or restricts.

Legal ties.

noun
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noun
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A knot of hair, as at the back of a wig.

noun
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A necktie (item of clothing consisting of a strip of cloth tied around the neck). See also bow tie, black tie.
noun
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The situation in which two or more participants in a competition are placed equally.

It's two outs in the bottom of the ninth, tie score.

noun
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A twist tie, a piece of wire embedded in paper, strip of plastic with ratchets, or similar object which is wound around something and tightened.
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A strong connection between people or groups of people; a bond.

The sacred ties of friendship or of duty; the ties of allegiance.

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(construction) A structural member firmly holding two pieces together.

Ties work to maintain structural integrity in windstorms and earthquakes.

noun
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(rail transport, US) A horizontal wooden or concrete structural member that supports and ties together rails.
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(cricket) The situation at the end of all innings of a match where both sides have the same total of runs (different to a draw).
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(sports, UK) A meeting between two players or teams in a competition.

The FA Cup third round tie between Liverpool and Cardiff was their first meeting in the competition since 1957.

noun
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(music) A curved line connecting two notes of the same pitch denoting that they should be played as a single note with the combined length of both notes (not to be confused with a slur).
noun
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(statistics) One or more equal values or sets of equal values in the data set.
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(surveying) A bearing and distance between a lot corner or point and a benchmark or iron off site.
noun
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(graph theory) Connection between two vertices.
noun
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To twist (a string, rope, or the like) around itself securely.

Tie this rope in a knot for me, please.

Tie the rope to this tree.

verb
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To form (a knot or the like) in a string or the like.

Tie a knot in this rope for me, please.

verb
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To attach or fasten (one thing to another) by string or the like.

Tie him to the tree.

verb
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To secure (something) by string or the like.

Tie your shoes.

verb
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(intransitive) To have the same score or position as another in a competition or ordering.

They tied for third place.

They tied the game.

verb
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(US) To have the same score or position as (another) in a competition or ordering.

He tied me for third place.

verb
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(music) To unite (musical notes) with a line or slur in the notation.
verb
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Tie is defined as a long narrow finished piece of fabric worn around the neck and under the collar of a button-down shirt.

An example of a tie is what's worn around the neck and knotted at the throat of someone wearing a suit.

noun
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tie one on
  • To become intoxicated; go on a drinking spree.
idiom
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tie the knot
  • To get married.
  • To perform a marriage ceremony.
idiom
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tie down
  • To confine; restrain; restrict.
idiom
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tie in
  • To bring into or have a connection.
  • To make or be consistent, harmonious, etc.
idiom
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tie into
  • To attack vigorously.
idiom
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tie off
  • To make (a rope or line) fast.
  • To close off passage through by tying with something.
idiom
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tie one on
  • To get drunk.
idiom
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tie up
  • To tie firmly or securely.
  • To wrap up and tie with string, cord, etc.
  • To moor as to a dock.
  • To obstruct; hinder; stop.
idiom
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Origin of tie

  • Middle English teien from Old English tīgan deuk- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old English tÄ«Ä¡an, tiegan.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Old English tÄ“ag, tÄ“ah.
    From Wiktionary