Ribbon meaning

rĭbən
Frequency:
To tear into ribbons or shreds.
verb
3
0
To decorate, trim, or mark with or as with a ribbon or ribbons.
verb
1
0
Tattered or ragged strips.

A dress torn to ribbons.

noun
0
0
Anything suggesting such a strip.

A ribbon of blue sky.

noun
0
0
Torn strips or shreds; tatters.

A garment torn to ribbons.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
A narrow strip of inked cloth or plastic against which type characters strike for printing, as in a typewriter.
noun
0
0
Reins used in driving.
noun
0
0
To split or tear into ribbonlike strips or shreds.
verb
0
0
To extend or form in a ribbonlike strip or strips.
verb
0
0
(1) See ribbon cable.
0
0
Advertisement
A long, narrow strip of material used for decoration of clothing or the hair or gift wrapping.
noun
0
0
An inked strip of material against which type is pressed to print letters in a typewriter or printer.
noun
0
0
A narrow strip or shred.

A steel or magnesium ribbon.

Sails torn to ribbons.

noun
0
0
(shipbuilding) Alternative form of ribband.
noun
0
0
(slang, dated, in the plural) Driving reins.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
(heraldry) A bearing similar to the bend, but only one eighth as wide.
noun
0
0
(spinning) A sliver.
noun
0
0
(computing, graphical user interface) A toolbar that incorporates tabs and menus.
noun
0
0
(cooking) In ice cream and similar confections, an ingredient (often chocolate, butterscotch, caramel, or fudge) added in a long narrow strip.
noun
0
0
To decorate with ribbon.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
The definition of a ribbon is a thin strip of silk or rayon fabric with finished images.

An example of a ribbon is what a young girl might use to tie up her hair.

noun
0
1
A narrow strip or band of fabric, especially a fine fabric such as satin or velvet, finished at the edges and used for trimming, tying, or finishing.
noun
0
1
An inked strip of cloth used for making an impression, as in a typewriter.
noun
0
1
Reins for driving horses.
noun
0
1
To decorate or tie with ribbons.
verb
0
1
Advertisement

Origin of ribbon

  • Middle English ribban, riban from Old French ruban probably of Germanic origin bhendh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French riban (French: ruban).

    From Wiktionary