Win meaning

wĭn
To be successful or victorious in (a contest, game, dispute, etc.)
verb
7
3
An amount won or earned.
noun
6
2
To make (one's way) with effort.
verb
4
2
To get by effort, labor, struggle, etc.
  • To gain or acquire through accomplishment.
    To win distinctions.
  • To achieve or attain (one's point, demands, etc.)
  • To gain (a prize or award) in competition.
  • To obtain or earn (a livelihood, security, etc.)
verb
4
2
To succeed in reaching or achieving a specified condition or place; get.

To win back to health.

verb
3
1
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To persuade to marry one.
verb
2
1
First position at the finish of a race.
noun
2
1
(1) A short name for Windows versions; for example, Win7, Win8 and Win10. In the 1990s, the executable program name for Windows 3.0 and 3.1 was WIN.EXE, which was typed in after DOS booted. Microsoft surely must have enjoyed having millions of people type "win" every time they launched Windows. See Windows 3.0.
2
1
To receive as a prize or reward for performance.

Won a gold medal.

verb
2
3
To reach with difficulty.

The ship won a safe port.

verb
2
3
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To take in battle; capture.

Won the heights after a fierce attack.

verb
2
3
Win is defined as to finish first or be the most successful at something.

An example of to win is a runner being the first to cross the finish line in a race.

An example of to win is a dog getting first place at a dog show.

verb
1
0
(UK dialectal, Scotland) Pleasure; joy; delight.
noun
1
0
An individual victory (opposite of a loss)

Our first win of the season put us in high spirits.

noun
1
0
To achieve victory or finish first in a competition.
verb
1
2
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To achieve success in an effort or venture.

Struggled to overcome the handicap and finally won.

verb
1
2
To achieve victory or finish first in.

Won the race.

verb
1
2
To get to, usually with effort; reach.

They won the top of the hill by noon.

verb
1
2
To prevail upon; influence; persuade.

To win someone over to one's side.

verb
1
2
An act of winning; victory, as in a contest.
noun
1
2
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1998, Rhapsody, Emerald Sword.

For the glory, the power to win the Black Lord, I will search for the Emerald Sword.

verb
0
1
To triumph or achieve victory in (a game, a war, etc).
verb
0
1
To gain (a prize) by succeeding in competition or contest.

To win the jackpot in a lottery; to win a bottle of wine in a raffle.

verb
0
1
To obtain (someone) by wooing.
verb
0
1
(intransitive) To achieve victory.

Who would win in a fight between an octopus and a dolphin?

verb
0
1
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To obtain (something desired).

The company hopes to win an order from the government worth over 5 million dollars.

verb
0
1
To cause a victory for someone.

The success of the economic policies should win Mr. Smith the next elections.

The policy success should win the elections for Mr. Smith.

verb
0
1
Sir Walter Scott.

And when the stony path began, / By which the naked peak they won, / Up flew the snowy ptarmigan.

verb
0
1
(mining) To extract (ore, coal, etc.).

verb
0
1
noun
0
1
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noun
0
1
(slang) A feat, an (extraordinary) achievement (opposite of a fail)
noun
0
1
win the day
  • To be successful.
idiom
1
1
win out
  • to win all of the remaining games or contests on one's current schedule
idiom
1
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of win

  • Middle English winnen from Old English winnan to fight, strive wen-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English winnen, from Old English winnan (“to labour, swink, toil, trouble oneself; resist, oppose, contradict; fight, strive, struggle, rage; endure") (compare Old English Ä¡ewinnan (“conquer, obtain, gain; endure, bear, suffer; be ill")), from Proto-Germanic *winnanÄ… (“to swink, labour, win, gain, fight"), from Proto-Indo-European *wen- (“to strive, wish, desire, love"). Cognate with Low German winnen, Dutch winnen, German gewinnen, Swedish vinna.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English winne, wunne, from Old English wynn (“joy, rapture, pleasure, delight, gladness"), from Proto-Germanic *wunjō (“joy, delight, pleasure, lust"), from Proto-Indo-European *wen- (“to strive, wish, desire, love"). Cognate with German Wonne (“bliss, joy, delight"), Danish ynde (“grace"), Icelandic yndi (“delight").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English winn, winne, from Old English winn (“toil, labor, trouble, hardship; profit, gain; conflict, strife, war"), from Proto-Germanic *winnÄ… (“labour, struggle, fight"), from Proto-Indo-European *wen- (“to strive, desire, wish, love"). Cognate with German Gewinn (“profit, gain").

    From Wiktionary