Seduce meaning

sĭ-do͝os', -dyo͝os'
To entice into a different state or position.
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To win over or attract someone.
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To induce (someone) to engage in sexual activity, as by flirting or persuasion.
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To seduce is to persuade someone to do something that is not considered proper conduct.

When you entice someone to go out on a date with you and to have intercourse with you, this is an example of seduce.

When easy money tempts you to do something wrong, this is an example of a situation where the promise of easy money seduced you.

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To attract or lead (someone) away from proper behavior or thinking.
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To entice.
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To beguile or lure someone away from duty, accepted principles, or proper conduct; to lead astray.

He was seduced by the dark side of The Force. - Obi Wan Kenobi, Star Wars.

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To entice or induce someone to engage in a sexual relationship.

Mrs. Robinson, are you trying to seduce me? - Benjamin Braddock, The Graduate.

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(by extension, euphemistic) To have sexual intercourse with.

He had repeatedly seduced the girl in his car, hotels and his home.

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Origin of seduce

  • Middle English seduisen from Old French seduire seduis- alteration (influenced by Medieval Latin sēdūcere to lead astray) of suduire to seduce from Latin subdūcere to withdraw sub- sub- dūcere to lead deuk- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Borrowed from Latin seducere (“to lead apart or astray"), from se- (“aside, away, astray") + ducere (“to lead"); see duct. Compare adduce, conduce, deduce, etc.
    From Wiktionary