Charm meaning

chärm
To function as an amulet or charm.
verb
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To act on as though by magic; seemingly cast a spell on.
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To be alluring or pleasing.
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To attract or please greatly; enchant; allure; fascinate; delight.
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To protect from harm as though by magic.
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To practice magic.
verb
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To be charming; please greatly.
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The definition of charm is something thought to have magic power, piece of jewelry or a person or thing that attracts others.

An example of a charm is a rabbit's foot keychain.

An example of a charm is a small silver butterfly pendant worn with other pendants on a bracelet.

An example of a charm is someone with a beautiful and welcoming smile.

noun
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A small ornament, such as one worn on a bracelet.
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To delight or fascinate.

The simple elegance of the meal charmed the guests.

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To cast or seem to cast a spell on; bewitch.
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To use magic spells.
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Any object assumed to have such power, as an amulet or talisman.
noun
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Any trinket worn as a decoration on a bracelet, necklace, watch chain, etc.
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Any action or gesture assumed to have magic power.
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A quality or feature in someone or something that attracts or delights people.
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An individuating property of quarks and other elementary particles: it is expressed as a quantum number, with +1 used of a particle that has charm (charmed particle) and 0 used of one that does not.
noun
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One of the flavors of quarks, contributing to the charm number—a quantum number—for hadrons.
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A charmed particle is a particle that contains at least one charmed quark or charmed antiquark. The charmed quark was hypothesized to account for the longevity of the J/psi particle and to explain differences in the behavior of leptons and hadrons.
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An object, act or words believed to have magic power.

A charm against evil.

It works like a charm.

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The ability to persuade, delight or arouse admiration; often constructed in the plural.

He had great personal charm.

She tried to win him over with her charms.

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(physics) A quantum number of hadrons determined by the quantity of charm quarks & antiquarks.
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A small trinket on a bracelet or chain, etc., traditionally supposed to confer luck upon the wearer.

She wears a charm bracelet on her wrist.

noun
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​To seduce, persuade or fascinate someone or something.
  • John Milton.
    They, on their mirth and dance / Intent, with jocund music charm his ear.
  • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, The Celebrity.
    The Celebrity, by arts unknown, induced Mrs. Judge Short and two other ladies to call at Mohair on an afternoon when Mr. Cooke was trying a trotter on the track. The three returned wondering and charmed with Mrs. Cooke; they were sure she had had no hand in the furnishing of that atrocious house.

He charmed her with his dashing tales of his days as a sailor.

verb
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To use a magical charm upon; to subdue, control, or summon by incantation or supernatural influence.

After winning three games while wearing the chain, Dan began to think it had been charmed.

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To protect with, or make invulnerable by, spells, charms, or supernatural influences.

She led a charmed life.

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To subdue or overcome by some secret power, or by that which gives pleasure; to allay; to soothe.
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The mixed sound of many voices, especially of birds or children.
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A flock, group (especially of finches).
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To induce by means of strong personal attractiveness.

Charmed the guard into admitting them without invitations.

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Origin of charm

  • Middle English charme magic spell from Old French from Latin carmen incantation kan- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Variant of chirm, from Middle English chirme, from Old English ċierm (“cry, alarm”), from Proto-Germanic *karmiz.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Old French charme (chant, magic spell), from Latin carmen (song, incantation)
    From Wiktionary