Grace meaning

grās
The definition of grace is poise, elegance, forgiveness, or a blessing.

An example of grace is the way a beautiful, stylish woman easily walks across a room.

An example of grace is the letting go of a past wrong done to you.

An example of grace is the prayer said at the beginning of a meal.

noun
18
7
An appoggiatura, trill, or other musical ornament in the music of 16th and 17th century England.
noun
16
5
To bring honor to; dignify.
verb
7
1
Grace is defined as to honor, or to bring beauty or charm.

An example of grace is a celebrity showing up at a fundraiser to raise more money; grace the fundraiser with their presence.

An example of grace is adding an elegant table decoration to a picnic; grace the picnic table with an elegant centerpiece.

verb
5
9
To supply with heavenly grace.

verb
4
1
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Ornamental notes or effects collectively, as appoggiaturas, slides, trills, etc.
noun
4
2
Three sister goddesses, known in Greek mythology as Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia, who dispense charm and beauty.
noun
4
7
A temporary immunity or exemption; a reprieve.
noun
3
1
A short prayer of blessing or thanksgiving said before or after a meal.
noun
3
1
(not countable, theology) Free and undeserved favour, especially of God. Unmerited divine assistance given to humans for their regeneration or sanctification.

I'm so grateful to God for the grace that He has given me.

noun
3
3
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(not countable) Charming, pleasing qualities.

The Princess brought grace to an otherwise dull and boring party.

noun
2
0
A sense of fitness or propriety.
noun
2
1
Seemingly effortless beauty or charm of movement, form, or proportion.
noun
1
1
A characteristic or quality pleasing for its charm or refinement.
noun
1
1
To dignify or raise by an act of favour; to honour.
verb
1
2
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(card games) A special move in a solitaire or patience game that is normally against the rules.
noun
0
0

He graced the room with his presence.

He graced the room by simply being there.

His portrait graced a landing on the stairway.

verb
0
0
A city in Idaho.
pronoun
0
0
An unincorporated community in Kentucky.
pronoun
0
0
An unincorporated community in Mississippi.
pronoun
0
0
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Used with His, Her, or Your as a title and form of address for a duke, duchess, or archbishop.
noun
0
1
To honor or favor.

You grace our table with your presence.

verb
0
1
To give beauty, elegance, or charm to.
verb
0
1
To embellish with grace notes.
verb
0
1
Beauty or charm of form, composition, movement, or expression.
noun
0
1
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An attractive quality, feature, manner, etc.
noun
0
1
Goodwill; favor.
noun
0
1
Mercy; clemency.
noun
0
1
A short prayer in which blessing is asked, or thanks are given, for a meal.
noun
0
1
A title of respect or reverence used in speaking to or of an archbishop, duke, or duchess.
noun
0
1
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To give or add grace or graces to; decorate; adorn.
verb
0
1
To add a grace note or notes to.
verb
0
1
A feminine name: dim. Gracie.
noun
0
1
(not countable) Elegant movement; poise or balance.

The dancer moved with grace and strength.

noun
0
1
(not countable, theology) Divine assistance in resisting sin.
noun
0
1
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(countable) Short prayer of thanks before or after a meal.

It has become less common to say grace before having dinner.

For examples of the use of this sense see: citations.

noun
0
1
(finance) An allowance of time granted for a debtor during which he is free of at least part of his normal obligations towards the creditor.

The repayment of the loan starts after a three years' grace (period).

noun
0
1
(music) To add grace notes, cadenzas, etc., to.
verb
0
1
A female given name.
pronoun
0
1
A favor rendered by one who need not do so; indulgence.
noun
0
2
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Any of the Graces.
noun
0
2
in the bad graces of
  • Out of favor with.
idiom
0
0
in the good graces of
  • In favor with.
idiom
1
0
with bad grace
  • In a grudging manner.
idiom
0
0
with good grace
  • In a willing manner.
idiom
0
0
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fall from grace
  • To do wrong; sin.
idiom
0
0
have the grace
  • To be so aware of what is proper as (to do something).
idiom
0
0
in the good (or bad) graces of
  • In favor (or disfavor) with.
idiom
0
0
with bad grace
  • Sullenly or reluctantly.
idiom
0
0
with good grace
  • Graciously or willingly.
idiom
0
0
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

in the bad graces of
in the good graces of
have the grace
in the good (<i>or</i> bad) graces of

Origin of grace

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin grātia from grātus pleasing gwerə-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English grace, from Old French grace (Modern French grâce), from Latin grātia "kindness, favour, esteem", from grātus ‘pleasing’ from Proto-Indo-European *gwer- (“to praise, welcome”). Compare grateful. Displaced native Middle English held, hield "grace" (from Old English held, hyld "grace"), Middle English este "grace, favour, pleasure" (from Old English ēste "grace, kindness, favour"), Middle English athmede(n) "grace" (from Old English ēadmēdu "grace"), Middle English are, ore "grace, mercy, honour" (from Old English ār "grace, kindness, mercy").

    From Wiktionary

  • From the noun grace, first used by Puritans in the 16th century. In Roman Catholic use it may refer to Our Lady of Graces, cognate with Italian Grazia.

    From Wiktionary