Grace Definition

grās
graced, graces, gracing
noun
graces
Beauty or charm of form, composition, movement, or expression.
Webster's New World
An attractive quality, feature, manner, etc.
Webster's New World
Any of the Graces.
Webster's New World
A sense of what is right and proper; decency.
Webster's New World
A disposition to be generous or helpful; goodwill.
American Heritage
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verb
graced, graces, gracing
To bring honor to; dignify.
Webster's New World
To give or add grace or graces to; decorate; adorn.
Webster's New World
To add a grace note or notes to.
Webster's New World
Antonyms:
disgraceuglify
pronoun
A female given name.
Wiktionary

A city in Idaho.

Wiktionary

An unincorporated community in Kentucky.

Wiktionary

An unincorporated community in Mississippi.

Wiktionary
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idiom
in the bad graces of
  • Out of favor with.
American Heritage
in the good graces of
  • In favor with.
American Heritage
with bad grace
  • In a grudging manner.
American Heritage
with good grace
  • In a willing manner.
American Heritage
fall from grace
  • to do wrong; sin
Webster's New World
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Other Word Forms of Grace

Noun

Singular:
grace
Plural:
Graces

Idioms, Phrasal Verbs Related to Grace

Origin of Grace

  • From Middle English grace, from Old French grace (Modern French grâce), from Latin grātia "kindness, favour, esteem", from grātus ‘pleasing’ from Proto-Indo-European *gwer- (“to praise, welcome”). Compare grateful. Displaced native Middle English held, hield "grace" (from Old English held, hyld "grace"), Middle English este "grace, favour, pleasure" (from Old English ēste "grace, kindness, favour"), Middle English athmede(n) "grace" (from Old English ēadmēdu "grace"), Middle English are, ore "grace, mercy, honour" (from Old English ār "grace, kindness, mercy").

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin grātia from grātus pleasing gwerə-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From the noun grace, first used by Puritans in the 16th century. In Roman Catholic use it may refer to Our Lady of Graces, cognate with Italian Grazia.

    From Wiktionary

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