Favor meaning

fāvər
(archaic) A business letter or note.

Your favor of the 15th June.

noun
5
2
A gracious, friendly, or obliging act that is freely granted.

Do someone a favor.

noun
4
1
Advantage; benefit.

Sailed under favor of cloudless skies.

noun
3
0
Sexual privileges granted by a woman.
noun
3
1
To treat with care; be gentle with.

Favored my wounded leg.

verb
2
0
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(obsolete) A communication, especially a letter.
noun
1
1
Favor is defined as approval or something you do for someone else.

An example of favor is when your daughter behaves correctly.

An example of favor is when you pick up the drycleaning for your husband so he doesn't have to.

noun
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0
The definition of favor is to show preferential treatment and to act like you like someone better than others.

An example of favor is when a teacher always calls only on the students she likes.

verb
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Unfair partiality; favoritism.

The referees were warned not to show favor to either team.

noun
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(obsolete) A facial feature.
noun
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0
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To perform a kindness or service for; oblige.
verb
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0
To believe to be most likely to succeed.

The Tigers are favored to win the championship.

verb
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0
(chiefly southern us) To resemble in appearance.

She favors her father.

verb
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0
Friendly or kind regard; good will; approval; liking.
noun
0
0
Unfair partiality; favoritism.
noun
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0
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A kind, obliging, friendly, or generous act.

To do someone a favor.

noun
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(obs.) Attractiveness; charm.
noun
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To regard with favor; approve or like.
verb
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To be indulgent or too indulgent toward; be partial to; prefer unfairly.
verb
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0
To be for; support; advocate; endorse.
verb
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0
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To make easier; help; assist.

Rain favored his escape.

verb
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To look like; resemble in facial features.

To favor one's mother.

verb
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0
To use gently; spare.

To favor an injured leg.

verb
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0
A kind or helpful deed; an instance of voluntarily assisting (someone).

He did me a favor when he took the time to drive me home.

noun
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Goodwill; benevolent regard.

She enjoyed the queen's favor.

To fall out of favor.

noun
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A small gift; a party favor.

At the holiday dinner, the hosts had set a favor by each place setting.

A marriage favour is a bunch or knot of white ribbons or white flowers worn at a wedding.

noun
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0
Mildness or mitigation of punishment; lenity.
noun
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0
The object of regard; person or thing favoured.
noun
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0
(law) Partiality; bias.

noun
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(archaic, polite) A letter.

Your favour of yesterday is received.

noun
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0
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To look upon fondly; to prefer.
verb
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0
To do a favor [noun sense 1] for; to show beneficence toward.

Would you favor us with a poetry reading?

verb
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0
To treat with care.

Favoring your sore leg will only injure the other one.

verb
0
0
To have a similar appearance, to look like another person.

You favor your grandmother more than your mother.

verb
0
0
Behalf; interest.

An error in our favor.

noun
0
1
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To resemble another in appearance.

She and her father favor.

verb
0
1
To do a kindness for.
verb
0
1
in favor of
  • In support of; approving:
    We are in favor of her promotion to president.
  • To the advantage of:
    The court decided in favor of the plaintiff.
  • Inscribed or made out to the benefit of:
    A check in favor of a charity.
idiom
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0
find favor with
  • to be regarded with favor by; be pleasing to
idiom
1
0
in favor
  • favored; liked
idiom
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in favor of
  • approving; supporting; endorsing
  • to the advantage of
  • payable to, as a check, etc.
idiom
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0
in someone's favor
  • to someone's advantage or credit
idiom
0
1
out of favor
  • no longer popular or a favorite; no longer in good standing
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

find favor with
in someone's favor

Origin of favor

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin from favēre to be favorable

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman favour, from mainland Old French favor, from Latin favor, respelled in American English to more closely match its Latin etymon.

    From Wiktionary