Benefit meaning

bĕn'ə-fĭt
To benefit is defined as to be helpful to others, or to receive help from others.

An example of benefit is to make a donation to the community's volunteer fire department.

An example of benefit is to receive help after a serious illness.

verb
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The definition of a benefit is something that will provide an advantage for others, something you may receive as compensation from an insurance company or an event to raise money for a worthwhile cause.

An example of a benefit is the action of creating a community playground.

An example of a benefit is the payment you receive from the insurance company if your house burns down.

An example of a benefit is a dinner intended to raise money for the Susan G. Komen foundation.

noun
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19
Payments made by an insurance company, public agency, welfare society, etc. as during sickness, retirement, unemployment, etc. or for death.
noun
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5
To be helpful or useful to.
verb
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5
A kindly, charitable act; benefaction.
noun
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6
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To receive advantage; profit.
verb
5
3
An advantage, help, sake or aid from something.

It was for her benefit. His benefit was free beer.

noun
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4
(intransitive) To receive a benefit (from); to be a beneficiary.
verb
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2
Any public performance, bazaar, dance, etc. the proceeds of which are to help a certain person, group, or cause.
noun
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3
To derive benefit.

You will benefit from her good example.

verb
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To do good to or for; aid.
verb
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4
That which is helpful; advantage; financial assistance; gain; privilege; profit.
noun
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2
noun
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2
A performance, etc, given to raise funds for some cause.
noun
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2
To be or to provide a benefit to.
verb
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2
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A public entertainment, performance, or social event held to raise funds for a person or cause.
noun
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2
A kindly deed.
noun
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2
noun
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2
benefit of the doubt
  • A favorable judgment granted in the absence of full evidence.
idiom
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1

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of benefit

  • Middle English from Old French bienfait good deed from Latin benefactum from benefacere to do a service benefaction
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Late Middle English benefytt, benefett, alteration (due to Latin bene-) of Middle English benfet, bienfet, bienfait (“good or noble deed”), from Anglo-Norman benfet (“well-done”), Middle French bienfait, from Old French bienfet, bienfait (“foredeal, favour”), from past participle of Old French bienfaire (“to do good, do well”), from bien (“well”) + faire (“to do”), modelled after Latin benefactum (“good deed”). More at benefactor.
    From Wiktionary