Relieve meaning

rĭ-lēv
To rob or deprive.

Pickpockets relieved him of his money.

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To make less tedious, monotonous, etc. by being or providing a pleasing change.
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To serve as a relief pitcher.
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To lessen or alleviate something, such as pain or a symptom.
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To free from pain, anxiety, or distress.
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To ease (a person, person's thoughts etc.) from mental distress; to stop (someone) feeling anxious or worried, to alleviate the distress of. [from 14th c.]

I was greatly relieved by the jury's verdict.

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To ease (someone, a part of the body etc.) or give relief from physical pain or discomfort. [from 14th c.]
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To alleviate (pain, distress, mental discomfort etc.). [from 14th c.]
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To provide comfort or assistance to (someone in need, especially in poverty). [from 14th c.]
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(now rare) To raise (someone) out of danger or from (a specified difficulty etc.). [from 15th c.]
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(law) To free (someone) from debt or legal obligations; to give legal relief to. [from 15th c.]

This shall not relieve either Party of any obligations.

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To bring military help to (a besieged town); to lift the seige on. [from 16th c.]
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To release (someone) from or of a difficulty, unwanted task, responsibility etc. [from 16th c.]
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(military, job) To free (someone) from their post, task etc. by taking their place. [from 16th c.]
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(now rare) To make (something) stand out; to make prominent, bring into relief. [from 18th c.]
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(reflexive) To go to the toilet; to defecate or urinate. [from 20th c.]
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To relieve is to lessen physical or mental pain or to lessen someone's stress or burden.

An example of relieve is what pain killers do to pain.

An example of relieve is when you go to work and take over for the person during their family emergency.

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To free from pain, anxiety, or distress.

I was relieved by the news that they had arrived home safely.

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To make prominent or effective by contrast; set off.
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To set off by contrast; make distinct or prominent.
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relieve (oneself)
  • To urinate or defecate.
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relieve oneself
  • To urinate or defecate.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of relieve

  • Middle English releven from Old French relever from Latin relevāre re- re- levāre to raise legwh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French relever, specifically from the conjugated forms such as (jeo) relieve (“I lift up"), and its source, Latin relevo (“to lift up, lighten, relieve, alleviate"), combined form of re- (“back") + levo (“to lift"). Compare levant, levity, etc.

    From Wiktionary