Absolve meaning

əb-zŏlv, -sŏlv
To forgive misconduct.
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The definition of absolve is to be forgiven for your sins or to be set free of all of the legal or moral consequences of your actions.

An example of absolve is when a priest hears confession and tells the confessor that God has forgiven him.

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To pronounce clear of guilt or blame.
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To relieve of a requirement or obligation.
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To pronounce free from guilt or blame; acquit.
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To free (from a duty, promise, etc.)
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To free from guilt or suspicion; for example, when evidence proves that a suspect is innocent of a crime.
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To free from the penalties imposed as a result of misconduct.
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To free from a debt, duty, obligation, or responsibility.
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To set free, release or discharge (from obligations, debts, responsibility etc.). [First attested around 1350 to 1470.]

You will absolve a subject from his allegiance.

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To pronounce free from or give absolution for a penalty, blame, or guilt. [First attested in the mid 16th century.]
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(law) To pronounce not guilty; to grant a pardon for. [First attested in the mid 16th century.]
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(theology) To grant a remission of sin; to give absolution to. [First attested in the mid 16th century.]
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(theology) To remit a sin; to give absolution for a sin. [First attested in the late 16th century.]
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To pass a course or test; to gain credit for a class; to qualify academically.
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Origin of absolve

  • Middle English absolven from Latin absolvere absolute

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • First attested in the early 15th Century. From Middle English absolven, from Latin absolvere, present active infinitive of absolvō (“set free, acquit”), from ab (“away from”) + solvō (“loosen, free, release”).

    From Wiktionary