Absolute meaning

ăbsə-lo͝ot, ăbsə-lo͝ot
Frequency:
Absolute is defined as something that is 100 percent complete with no exceptions.

An example of absolute silence would be total silence with no noise at all.

adjective
8
1
In programming, a mathematical function that always returns a positive number. For example, ABS(25-100) yields 75, not -75. See absolute address.
6
0
Not limited by a constitution, parliament, etc.; unrestricted.

An absolute ruler.

adjective
4
0
Not to be doubted or questioned; positive.

Absolute proof.

adjective
4
2
The definition of absolute is something that is always true and accepted as fact, with no arguments against it or conditions necessary for it to be true.

An example of an absolute is the idea that everyone will die some day.

noun
3
2
Advertisement
Complete and unconditional; final.

An absolute divorce.

adjective
3
2
Not mixed; pure.

Absolute oxygen.

adjective
2
0
Something that is absolute.
noun
2
0
Perfect; complete; whole.

Absolute silence.

adjective
2
0
Positive; definite.

An absolute certainty.

adjective
2
0
Advertisement
Not dependent on, or without reference to, anything else; not relative.
adjective
1
0
Without condition or encumbrance.

Absolute ownership.

adjective
1
0
Not liable or subject to revisions; conclusive.
noun
1
0
(archaic) Complete in itself; perfect. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.]
adjective
1
0
Unrestricted; in sole control; possessing absolute power; independent, as in ownership or authority. [First attested in the late 15th century.]
adjective
1
0
Advertisement
Free from conditional limitations; operating or existing in full under all circumstances without variation. [First attested in the early 17th century.]
adjective
1
0
(philosophy) Existing, able to be thought of, or able to be viewed without relation to other things. [First attested in the late 18th century.]

Absolute motion.

Absolute time or space.

Absolute rights and duties are such as pertain to man in a state of nature as contradistinguished from relative rights and duties, or such as pertain to him in his social relations.

adjective
1
0
Not mixed; pure.

Absolute alcohol.

adjective
0
0
Not doubted; actual; real.

An absolute truth.

adjective
0
0
Of the absolute temperature scale.
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Without any conditions, encumbrance, qualification, or restriction. See also discretion, divorce, immunity, privilege, and fee.
noun
0
0
Free from any restraint or restriction in the exercise of government power.
noun
0
0
(grammar) Not immediately dependent on the other parts of the sentence; as[First attested around 1350 to 1470.]
  • (of a case form) Syntactically connected to the rest of the sentence in an atypical manner; ablative absolute; nominative absolute; genitive absolute; accusative absolute. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.].
  • Standing by itself in a loose syntactical connection, and qualifying the sentence as a whole rather than any single word in it. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.].
    Anyhow in 'anyhow, I made it home' is an absolute.
  • (of an adjective or possessive pronoun) Lacking a modified substantive. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.].
    Hungry in 'Feed the hungry.'.
  • (comparative, superlative) Expressing a relative term without a definite comparison.'[First attested around 1350 to 1470.].
    Older in 'An older person should be treated with respect.
  • Having no direct object. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.].
    Kill in 'If looks could kill...'.
  • (Ireland, Wales) An inflected verb that is not preceded by any number of articles or compounded with a preverb. [First attested around 1350 to 1470.].
adjective
0
0
Pure; unmixed; as, absolute alcohol. [First attested in the mid 16th century.]
adjective
0
0
(figuratively) Complete; utter; outright; unmitigated; entire; total; not qualified or diminished in any way; unrestricted; without limitation. [First attested in the late 16th century.]

When caught, he told an absolute lie.

adjective
0
0
Advertisement
Unconditional; free from any conditions, limitations, and relations; [First attested in the mid 16th century.]
adjective
0
0
Real; actual. [First attested in the early 17th century.]
adjective
0
0
(archaic) Certain; free from doubt or uncertainty, as a person or prediction. [First attested in the early 17th century.]
adjective
0
0
Positive; unquestionable; peremptory. [First attested in the early 17th century.]
adjective
0
0
Authoritative; peremptory.
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
(philosophy) Fundamental; ultimate; intrinsic; free from the variability and error natural to the human way of thinking and perception. [First attested in the late 18th century.]
adjective
0
0
(physics) Independent of arbitrary units of measurement not comparative or relative as,
  • Having reference to or derived from the simplest manner from the fundamental units of mass, time, and length.
  • Relating to the absolute temperature scale.
adjective
0
0
(law) Complete; unconditional; final; without encumbrances; not liable to change or cancellation.
adjective
0
0
(education) Pertaining to a grading system based on the knowledge of the individual and not on the comparative knowledge of the group of students.
adjective
0
0
(art) Concerned entirely with expressing beauty and feelings, lacking meaningful reference.
adjective
0
0
Advertisement
(dance) Utilizing the body to express ideas, independent of music and costumes.
adjective
0
0
(mathematics) Indicating an expression that is true for all real number; unconditional.
adjective
0
0
That which is independent of context-dependent interpretation, inviolate, fundamental. [First attested in the mid 19th century.]

Moral absolutes.

noun
0
0
Anything that is absolute. [First attested in the mid 19th century.]
noun
0
0
(geometry) In a plane, the two imaginary circular points at infinity; in space of three dimensions, the imaginary circle at infinity.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
(philosophy, usually capitalized) A realm which exists without reference to anything else; that which can be imagined purely by itself; absolute ego.
noun
0
0
(philosophy, usually capitalized) The unity of spirit and nature; God.
noun
0
0
(philosophy, usually capitalized) The whole of reality; the totality to which everything is reduced.
noun
0
0
Concentrated natural flower oil, used for perfumes.
noun
0
0
(philosophy) That which is totally unconditioned, unrestricted, pure, perfect, or complete; that which can be thought of without relation to others. [First attested in the mid 19th century.]
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Something that is absolute.
noun
0
1
the Absolute
  • Ultimate reality regarded as uncaused, unmodified, unified and complete, timeless, etc.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

the Absolute

Origin of absolute

  • Middle English absolut from Latin absolūtus unrestricted past participle of absolvere to absolve ab- away ab–1 solvere to loosen leu- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • First attested around 1380. From Middle English absolut, from Middle French absolut, from Latin absolūtus (“unconditional; unfettered; completed”), perfect passive participle of absolvō (“loosen, set free, complete”), from Latin ab (“away”) + solvo (“to loose”). Influenced in part by Old French absolu. Compare absolve.

    From Wiktionary