Imperfect definition

ĭm-pûrfĭkt
Not finished or complete; lacking in something.
adjective
6
1
Not perfect; having a defect, fault, or error.
adjective
6
3
Not reproducing sexually. Used of fungi.
adjective
6
4
A verb in this tense.
noun
3
1
(grammar) Of or being the tense of a verb that shows, usually in the past, an action or a condition as incomplete, continuous, or coincident with another action.
adjective
2
2
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(music) Designating an interval of a major or minor third or sixth.
adjective
2
2
The definition of imperfect is someone or something that has at least one fault or that is not fully formed or complete.

A china dish with a small crack in it is an example of something that would be described as imperfect.

A map of all of the homes in an area that is not completed is an example of an imperfect map.

adjective
0
0
The imperfect tense.
noun
0
0
A verb in the imperfect tense.
noun
0
0
Not perfect.
adjective
0
0
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(botany) Unisexual: having either male (with stamens) or female (with pistil) flowers, but not with both.
adjective
0
0
(taxonomy) Known or expected to be polyphyletic, as of a form taxon.
adjective
0
0
Something having a minor flaw.
noun
0
0
(grammar) A tense of verbs used in describing a past action that is incomplete or continuous.
noun
0
0
(law) Potentially unenforceable; limited or defective.

An imperfect right of self defense.

adjective
1
2
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A piece of merchandise having a minor flaw that does not impair its use, usually sold at a discount.
noun
1
2
(gram.) In certain inflected languages, designating or of the tense of a verb that indicates a past action or state as uncompleted, continuous, customary, or going on at the same time as another: “was writing” and “used to write” are English forms corresponding to the imperfect tense in such languages.
adjective
1
2
The imperfect tense.
noun
1
2
Not perfect.
adjective
1
3
(botany) Having either stamens or a pistil only. Used of a flower.
adjective
1
3
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
imperfect
Plural:
imperfects

Origin of imperfect

  • Middle English imparfit from Old French imparfait from Latin imperfectus in- not in–1 perfectus perfect perfect

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English imperfit, from Old French imparfit (modern: imparfait), from Latin imperfectus. Spelling modified 15c. to conform Latin etymology. See im- +‎ perfect.

    From Wiktionary