Flaw meaning

flô
Frequency:
An imperfection, often concealed, that impairs soundness.

A flaw in the crystal that caused it to shatter.

noun
8
3
A defect; fault; error.

A flaw in a legal document, in one's reasoning, etc.

noun
7
0
To cause a flaw in; make defective.

An argument that was flawed by specious reasoning.

verb
6
2
The definition of a flaw is a mark or error that makes something faulty.

An example of a flaw is a scratch on a gem.

An example of a flaw is an incorrect name on a legal document.

noun
6
4
A quick, intense burst, especially of wind, rain, or snow.
noun
3
1
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A defect or error in a contract or other document which may make the document invalid.

A flaw in a will, in a deed, or in a statute.

noun
2
0
To add a flaw to, to make imperfect or defective.
verb
2
0
(intransitive) To become imperfect or defective.
verb
2
0
A defect, fault, or imperfection, especially one that is hidden.
noun
2
1
A sudden burst or gust of wind of short duration.
noun
2
1
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A break, scratch, crack, etc. that spoils something; blemish.

A flaw in a diamond.

noun
1
0
To make or become faulty.
verb
1
0
A sudden, brief gust of wind, often with rain or snow; squall.
noun
1
0
A crack or breach, a gap or fissure; a defect of continuity or cohesion.

There is a flaw in that knife.

That vase has a flaw.

noun
1
0
A storm of short duration.
noun
1
1
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A sudden burst of noise and disorder; a tumult; uproar; a quarrel.
noun
0
2
A defect or shortcoming in something intangible.

The two leaders share the flaw of arrogance.

noun
0
3

Origin of flaw

  • Middle English flaue splinter perhaps from Old Norse flaga slab of stone plāk-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably of Scandinavian origin Swedish flaga gust of wind

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English flawe, flay (“a flake of fire or snow, spark, splinter”), probably from Old Norse flaga (“a flag or slab of stone, flake”), from Proto-Germanic *flagō (“a layer of soil”), from Proto-Indo-European *plāk- (“broad, flat”). Cognate with Icelandic flaga (“flake”), Swedish flaga (“flake, scale”), Danish flage (“flake”), Middle Low German vlage (“a layer of soil”), Old English flōh (“a frament, piece”).

    From Wiktionary