Glitch meaning

glĭch
Frequency:
A temporary or random hardware malfunction. It is possible that a bug in a program may cause the hardware to appear as if it had a glitch in it and vice versa. At times it can be extremely difficult to determine whether a problem lies within the hardware or the software. See glitch attack.
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A false or spurious electronic signal caused by a brief, unwanted surge of electric power.
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A sudden, brief change in the period of a pulsar, believed to be caused by sudden changes in the structure of the rotating star.
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(astronomy) A sudden change in the period of rotation of a neutron star.
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(slang) A mishap, error, malfunctioning, etc.
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(video games) A bug or an exploit.

Performing this glitch gives you extra lives.

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(music) A genre of experimental electronic music of the 1990s, characterized by a deliberate use of sonic artifacts that would normally be viewed as unwanted noise.
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My computer keeps glitching; every couple of hours it just reboots without warning.

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(video games) To perform an exploit or recreate a bug while playing a video game.

His character will glitch into the wall and out of the level.

verb
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The definition of a glitch is a minor setback, problem or unexpected malfunction.

When a part suddenly stops working on a machine, this is an example of a glitch.

When an obstacle comes up and hinders a planned course of action, this is an example of a glitch.

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A minor malfunction, mishap, or technical problem; a snag.

A computer glitch; a navigational glitch; a glitch in the negotiations.

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A problem affecting function; a bug; an imperfection; a quirk.

They are still trying to work out all the glitches.

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Origin of glitch

  • Probably from Yiddish glitsh a slip, lapse from glitshn to slip from Middle High German glitschen alteration of glīten to glide from Old High German glītan ghel-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Probably from Yiddish גליטש (glitsch), from dialectical German glitschig (“slippy”), from glitsch (“slide, glide, slip”) + -ig (“-y”). Related to gleiten (“glide”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Popularized 1960s, by US space program. Attested 1962 by American astronaut John Glenn, in reference to spikes in electrical current.

    From Wiktionary