Seed definition

sēd
To help (a business, for example) in its early development.
verb
6
1
To plant seeds in (land, for example); sow.
verb
3
0
Intended to help in early stages.

Provided seed capital for a fledgling business.

adjective
3
0
To remove the seeds from (fruit).
verb
3
1
Set aside for planting a new crop.

Seed corn; seed potatoes.

adjective
2
0
Advertisement
To arrange (the drawing for positions in a tournament) so that the more skilled contestants meet in the later rounds.
verb
1
0
The part of a flowering plant that typically contains the embryo with its protective coat and stored food and that can develop into a new plant under the proper conditions; fertilized and mature ovule.
noun
1
0
Seeds collectively.
noun
1
0
To plant with seeds.
verb
1
0
The definition of a seed is a structure that contains the embryo of a plant.

An example of seed is an almond.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
Something that resembles a seed, as:
  • A tiny bubble in a piece of glass.
  • (medicine) A form of a radioactive isotope that is used to localize and concentrate the amount of radiation administered to a body site, such as a tumor.
noun
0
0
(sports) A player who has been seeded for a tournament, often at a given rank.

A top seed.

noun
0
0
A mature plant ovule containing an embryo.
noun
0
0
A small dry fruit, spore, or other propagative plant part.
noun
0
0
Seeds considered as a group.

A farmer buying seed.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
The seed-bearing stage of a plant.

The grass is in seed.

noun
0
0
A larval shellfish or a hatchling fish.

Released scallop seed in the bay.

noun
0
0
An egg or cocoon of certain insects.

Silkworm seed.

noun
0
0
A source or beginning; a germ.

The seed of an idea.

noun
0
0
A small amount of material used to start a chemical reaction.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
A small crystal used to start a crystallization process.
noun
0
0
Offspring; progeny.
noun
0
0
Family stock; ancestry.
noun
0
0
Sperm; semen.
noun
0
0
To furnish with something that grows or stimulates growth or development.

A bioreactor seeded with bacteria.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
(medicine) To cause (cells or a tumor, for example) to grow or multiply.
verb
0
0
(meteorology) To sprinkle (a cloud) with particles, as of silver iodide, in order to disperse it or to produce precipitation.
verb
0
0
To plant (a crop, for example) as seeds in soil.
verb
0
0
To rank (a contestant) in this way.
verb
0
0
To sow seed.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To pass into the seed-bearing stage.
verb
0
0
(medicine) To grow or multiply, as a tumor.
verb
0
0
The source, origin, or beginning of anything.

The seeds of revolt.

noun
0
0
noun
0
0
Sperm or semen.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Something tiny, like a seed.
  • A tiny crystal or other particle, as one added to a solution or liquid to start crystallization.
  • A tiny bubble, as a flaw in glassware.
noun
0
0
(sports) A seeded player, team, etc.
noun
0
0
Any part, as a bulb, tuber, etc., from which a new plant can grow.

A potato seed.

noun
0
0
A small, usually hard, seedlike fruit.
noun
0
0
Descendants; posterity.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
Ancestry.
noun
0
0
In the development of certain lower animals, a form suitable for transplanting, as spat.
noun
0
0
The seed-bearing stage or condition.

In seed.

noun
0
0
To sow (seeds)
verb
0
0
To remove the seeds from.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To inject, fill, or scatter with seeds (see seed; esp., to sprinkle particles of dry ice, silver iodide, etc. into (clouds) in an attempt to induce rainfall.
verb
0
0
To provide with the means or stimulus for growing or developing.
verb
0
0
To distribute the names of the ranking contestants in (the draw for position in a tournament) so that those with the greatest skill are not matched together in the early rounds.
verb
0
0
To treat (a player) as a ranking contestant in this way.
verb
0
0
To form seeds; specif., to become ripe and produce seeds.
verb
0
0
Advertisement
To go to seed; shed seeds.
verb
0
0
To sow seeds.
verb
0
0
A mature plant ovule containing an embryo.
noun
0
0
A cell that disperses, especially a cancer cell that spreads from a primary tumor to another location in the body.
noun
0
0
A pellet filled with a radioactive isotope that is implanted at the site of a cancerous tumor to provide localized administration of radiation.
noun
0
0
Sperm; semen.
noun
0
0
To inoculate a culture medium with microorganisms.
verb
0
0
To disperse, as cancer cells.
verb
0
0
A mature fertilized ovule of angiosperms and gymnosperms that contains an embryo and the food it will need to grow into a new plant. Seeds provide a great reproductive advantage in being able to survive for extended periods until conditions are favorable for germination and growth. The seeds of gymnosperms (such as the conifers) develop on scales of cones or similar structures, while the seeds of angiosperms are enclosed in an ovary that develops into a fruit, such as a pome or nut. The structure of seeds varies somewhat. All seeds are enclosed in a protective seed coat. In certain angiosperms the embryo is enclosed in or attached to an endosperm , a tissue that it uses as a food source either before or during germination. All angiosperm embryos also have at least one cotyledon . The first seed-bearing plants emerged at least 365 million years ago in the late Devonian Period. Many angiosperms have evolved specific fruits for dispersal of seeds by the wind, water, or animals.
noun
0
0
To plant seeds in soil.
verb
0
0
To initiate rainfall or to generate additional rainfall by artificially increasing the precipitation efficiency of clouds.
verb
0
0
(countable) A fertilized grain, initially encased in a fruit, which may grow into a mature plant.
  • 2013 May-June, David Van Tassel, Lee DeHaan, “Wild Plants to the Rescue", American Scientist, volume 101, number 3:"Š
    Plant breeding is always a numbers game. [...] The wild species we use are rich in genetic variation, [...] . In addition, we are looking for rare alleles, so the more plants we try, the better. These rarities may be new mutations, or they can be existing ones that are neutral"”or are even selected against"”in a wild population. A good example is mutations that disrupt seed dispersal, leaving the seeds on the heads long after they are ripe.

If you plant a seed in the spring, you may have a pleasant surprise in the autumn.

noun
0
0
(countable, botany) A fertilized ovule, containing an embryonic plant.
noun
0
0
(uncountable) An amount of fertilized grain that cannot be readily counted.

The entire field was covered with geese eating the freshly sown seed.

noun
0
0
(uncountable) Semen.

Sometimes a man may feel encouraged to spread his seed before he settles down to raise a family.

noun
0
0
(countable) A precursor.

The seed of an idea; which idea was the seed (idea)?

noun
0
0
(countable) The initial state, condition or position of a changing, growing or developing process; the ultimate precursor in a defined chain of precursors.
  • The initial position of a competitor or team in a tournament. (seed position)
    The team with the best regular season record receives the top seed in the conference tournament.
  • The competitor or team occupying a given seed. (seed position)
    The rookie was a surprising top seed.
  • Initialization state of a pseudorandom number generator (PRNG). (seed number)
    If you use the same seed you will get exactly the same pattern of numbers.
  • Commercial message in a creative format placed on relevant sites on the Internet. (seed idea or seed message)
    The latest seed has attracted a lot of users in our online community.
noun
0
0

The seed of Abraham.

noun
0
0
Race; generation; birth.
noun
0
0
To plant or sow an area with seeds.

I seeded my lawn with bluegrass.

verb
0
0
To start; to provide, assign or determine the initial resources for, position of, state of.

A venture capitalist seeds young companies.

The tournament coordinator will seed the starting lineup with the best competitors from the qualifying round.

The programmer seeded fresh, uncorrupted data into the database before running unit tests.

verb
0
0
(sports, games) To allocate a seeding to a competitor.
verb
0
0
To be able to compete (especially in a quarter-final/semi-final/final).

The tennis player seeded into the quarters.

verb
0
0
To ejaculate inside the penetratee during intercourse, especially in the rectum.
verb
0
0
go
  • To pass into the seed-bearing stage.
  • To become weak or devitalized; deteriorate:
    The old neighborhood has gone to seed.
idiom
0
0
go to seed
  • to shed seeds after the time of flowering or bearing has passed
  • to become weak, useless, unprofitable, etc.; deteriorate
idiom
0
0

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
seed
Plural:
seeds

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of seed

  • Middle English from Old English sǣd, sēd sē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English seed, sede, side, from Old English sÄ“d, sÇ£d (“seed, that which is sown"), from Proto-Germanic *sÄ“diz (“seed"), from Proto-Indo-European *sÄ“tis-, *seh₁tis (corresponding to Proto-Germanic *sÄ“anÄ… (“to sow") +"Ž *-þiz), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₁- (“to sow, throw"). Cognate with West Frisian sied (“seed"), Dutch zaad (“seed"), Low German Saad (“seed"), German Saat (“seed"), Danish sæd (“seed"), Swedish säd (“seed"), Latin satio (“seeding, time of sowing, season"). More at sow.

    From Wiktionary