Sow meaning

The definition of a sow is a female adult pig.

An example of a sow is the mother of the baby pigs.

noun
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To scatter seed over (land, for example).
verb
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(military) A kind of covered shed, formerly used by besiegers in filling up and passing the ditch of a besieged place, sapping and mining the wall, etc.

noun
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Sow is defined as to spread or scatter something over an area of land.

An example of to sow is scattering sunflower seeds to grow a sunflower garden.

verb
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To scatter (seed) over the ground for growing.
verb
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To strew something around or over (an area); distribute something over.
verb
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To propagate; disseminate.

Sow rumors.

verb
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To scatter seed for growing.
verb
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To scatter or plant (seed) for growing.
verb
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To plant seed in or on (a field, ground, earth, etc.)
verb
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To spread or scatter; broadcast, disseminate, or propagate.

To sow hate.

verb
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To implant; inculcate.

To sow suspicion.

verb
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An adult female pig, especially one that has had at least one litter.
noun
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The adult female of several other animals, such as the bear.
noun
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noun
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A channel that conducts molten metal to molds.
noun
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A mass of metal solidified in a mold.
noun
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(derogatory, slang) A contemptible woman.
noun
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noun
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To scatter, disperse, or plant (seeds).

When I had sown the field, the day's work was over.

As you sow, so shall you reap.

verb
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(figuratively) To spread abroad; to propagate.
verb
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(figuratively) To scatter over; to besprinkle.
verb
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To sow seed for growing.
verb
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sow (one's) oats
  • To indulge in sexually promiscuous or dissolute behavior, especially as a young adult.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

sow (one's) oats

Origin of sow

  • Middle English from Old English sugu Old English sū- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English sowen from Old English sāwan sē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English sowe, from Old English sugu, from Proto-Germanic *sugō (compare West Frisian sûch, Dutch zeug, Low German Söög, Swedish sugga, Norwegian sugge), from Proto-Indo-European *suhâ‚‚kéhâ‚‚ (compare Welsh hwch (“pig"), Sanskrit सूकर (sÅ«kará, “swine, boar")), from *suhâ‚‚-, *sÅ«- "˜pig' (compare German Sau, Latin sÅ«s, Tocharian B suwo, Ancient Greek á½—Ï‚ (hỹs), Albanian thi, Avestan hÅ« (“boar") [script?]). See also swine.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English sowen, from Old English sāwan, from Proto-Germanic *sÄ“anÄ…, from Proto-Indo-European *seh₁-. Compare Dutch zaaien, German säen, Danish sÃ¥.

    From Wiktionary