Scatter meaning

skătər
To scatter is to spread something around in different directions or different places.

When you come into a room and throw your jacket on one chair and your bag in the hall, this is an example of a time when you scatter your belongings around.

When people come to a party together and then go off in different directions when they get there, this is an example of a time when they scatter around the room.

verb
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To allow (hits or walks) in small numbers over several innings. Used of a pitcher.
verb
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To separate and go in different directions; disperse.

The crowd scattered when it started to rain.

verb
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To cause to separate and go in different directions.

A dog scattering a flock of pigeons.

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To diffuse or deflect (radiation or particles).
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The act of scattering or the condition of being scattered.
noun
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Something scattered.
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To separate and drive in many directions; rout; disperse.
verb
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To waste; dissipate.
verb
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To diffuse or deflect in an irregular, random manner.
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To separate and go off in several directions.

The crowd scattered.

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The act or process of scattering.
noun
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That which is scattered about.
noun
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(ergative) To (cause to) separate and go in different directions; to disperse.

The police scattered the crowds.

The crowd scattered.

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Her ashes were scattered at the top of a waterfall.

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(physics) To deflect (radiation or particles).
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(intransitive) To occur or fall at widely spaced intervals.
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To frustrate, disappoint, and overthrow.

To scatter hopes or plans.

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Origin of scatter

  • Middle English scateren perhaps from northern dialectal alteration of Old English sceaterian

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English scateren, skateren, (also schateren, see shatter), from Old English sceaterian, probably from a dialect of Old Norse. Compare Middle Dutch scheteren (“to scatter"), Low German schateren, Dutch schateren (“to burst out laughing").

    From Wiktionary