Seebeck-effect meaning

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The creation of an electrical potential across points in a metal that are at different temperatures, caused by the tendency of valence electrons in the warmer part of the metal to migrate toward the colder part because of their thermal energy. The Seebeck effect is exploited in the design of thermocouples.
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The production of a current in a circuit when junctions composed of unlike metals have different temperatures, as in a thermocouple.
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The current so produced.
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The creation of an electrical potential across points in a metal that are at different temperatures. The effect is caused by the thermal energy of the valence electrons in the warmer part of the metal; the kinetic energy of these electrons, which are very free in metals, allows them to migrate toward the colder part more readily than the colder electrons migrate to the warmer part. The colder part of the metal is therefore more negatively charged than the warmer part, resulting in electric potential. The Seebeck effect is used in thermocouples . It was discovered by the German physicist Thomas Seebeck (1770–1831).
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(physics) The thermodynamic effect by which heat being passed through a thermocouple is converted into electricity.
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Origin of seebeck-effect

  • After Thomas Johann Seebeck (1770–1831), Estonian-born German physicist

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • After Thomas J. Seebeck, Estonian physicist and discoverer of the effect

    From Wiktionary