Electricity definition

ĭ-lĕk-trĭsĭ-tē, ēlĕk-
The branch of physics dealing with electricity.
noun
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A buildup of electric charge.
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Electric current, or a source of electric current.
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Electric current supplied as a public utility for lighting, heating, etc.
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Electricity is defined as the effects of an electric charge.

An example of electricity is the force that powers a light bulb.

An example of electricity is lightning.

An example of electricity is static electricity, the buildup of electric charges on an object's surface.

noun
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The collection of physical effects related to the force and motion of electrically charged particles, typically electrons, through or across matter and space.
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An electric charge.
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The physical science of such phenomena.
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The flow of electrons in a circuit. The speed of electricity is the speed of light (approximately 186,000 miles per second or 300,000,000 meters per second). In a wire, it is slowed due to the resistance in the material.Volts, Amps and WattsElectrical pressure (force) is measured in "volts," and its flow (current) is measured in "amperes" or simply "amps." The amount of work electricity produces is measured in "watts" (amps X volts). See electron, electrical and electronic.
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Intense, contagious emotional excitement.
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The physical phenomena arising from the behavior of electrons and protons that is caused by the attraction of particles with opposite charges and the repulsion of particles with the same charge.
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Strong emotional tension, excitement, etc.
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An electric current.
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From the Greek elektor, meaning shining or the sun. A fundamental form of energy created by the movement of electrons (negative charges), protons, or positrons (positive charges) and generating current. See also current.
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A property of amber and certain other substances to attract lightweight material when rubbed, or the cause of this property; now understood to be a form of energy (occurring in positive and negative modes) which is a fundamental property of electrons and certain other subatomic particles. [from 17th c.]
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The study of such energy; the branch of science dealing with electrical phenomena. [from 18th c.]
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A feeling of excitement; a thrill. [from 18th c.]

Opening night for the new production had an electricity unlike other openings.

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Electric power as used in homes etc., supplied by power stations or generators. [from 19th c.]
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A property of certain fundamental particles of all matter, as electrons (negative charges) and protons or positrons (positive charges) that have a force field associated with them and that can be separated by the expenditure of energy: electrical charge can be generated by friction, induction, or chemical change and is manifested by an accumulation of electrons on an atom or body, constituting a negative charge, and a loss of electrons, constituting a corresponding positive charge.
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Electric current used or regarded as a source of power.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
electricity
Plural:
electricities

Origin of electricity

  • From electric +‎ -ity.

    From Wiktionary