Ancestor meaning

ănsĕstər
Frequency:
The definition of an ancestor is a person or creature from whom one is descended or who lived in the past, or a person who came before.

Your great great-grandfather is an example of an ancestor.

King David and King Solomon are each an example of an ancestor of Jesus.

The Middle Eastern wildcat is an example of an ancestor of the modern house cat.

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An early type of animal from which later kinds have evolved.
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The deceased person from whom an estate has been inherited.
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The actual or hypothetical organism or stock from which later kinds evolved.
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A person from whom one is descended, especially if more remote than a grandparent; a forebear.
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Any person from whom one is descended, esp. one earlier in a family line than a grandparent; forefather; forebear.
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One from whom a person is descended, whether on the father's or mother's side, at any distance of time; a progenitor; a forefather.
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(figuratively) One who had the same role or function in former times.
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(law) One from whom an estate has descended;—the correlative of heir.
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A person from whom one is descended, especially if more remote than a grandparent; a forebear.
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A forerunner or predecessor.
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Anything regarded as a precursor or forerunner of a later thing.
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To be an ancestor of.
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The actual or hypothetical organism or stock from which later kinds evolved.
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One, such as a parent, grandparent, great-grandparent, who precedes another in lineage.
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Any relative from whom one inherits by intestate succession.
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An earlier type; a progenitor.

This fossil animal is regarded as the ancestor of the horse.

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The person from whom an estate has been inherited.
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Origin of ancestor

  • Middle English auncestre from Old French from Latin antecessor predecessor from antecessus past participle of antecēdere to precede ante- ante- cēdere to go ked- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English ancestre, auncestre, ancessour; the first forms from Old French ancestre (modern French ancêtre), from the Latin nominative antecessor one who goes before; the last form from Old French ancessor, from Latin accusative antecessorem, from antecedo (“to go before”); ante (“before”) + cedo (“to go”). See cede, and compare with antecessor.

    From Wiktionary