Fracture meaning

frăkchər
Fracture is defined as to break, crack or split.

An example of fracture is splitting a tree branch into two pieces.

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The definition of a fracture is a break or crack.

An example of a fracture is a broken toe.

noun
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A break, rupture, or crack, especially in bone or cartilage.
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(geology) A crack or fault in a rock.
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To disrupt or destroy as if by breaking.

Fractured the delicate balance of power.

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To abuse or misuse flagrantly, as by violating rules.

Ignorant writers who fracture the language.

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(slang) To cause to laugh heartily.
verb
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To undergo a fracture.
verb
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A breaking or being broken.
noun
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A break, crack, or split.
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A break in a body part, esp. in a bone, or a tear in a cartilage.
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The texture, shape, etc. of the broken surface of a mineral as distinct from when it breaks along its cleavage plane.

Conchoidal fracture.

noun
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To break, crack, or split.
verb
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To break up; disrupt.
verb
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To violate (rules or conventions) flagrantly or thoroughly.

A nonnative speaker who fractures the language.

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To break, crack, or split.
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To break up; disintegrate.
verb
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The act or process of breaking.
noun
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A break, rupture, or crack, especially in bone or cartilage.
noun
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To cause to break.
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A break or rupture in bone tissue. &diamf3; A comminuted fracture results in more than two fragments. &diamf3; Although most fractures are caused by a direct blow or sudden, twisting force, stress fractures result from repetitive physical activity. &diamf3; In an incomplete fracture , the fracture line does not completely traverse the bone.
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The act of breaking, or something that has broken, especially that in bone or cartilage.
noun
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(geology) A fault or crack in a rock.
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To break, or cause something to break.
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Origin of fracture

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin frāctūra from frāctus past participle of frangere to break bhreg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French, from Latin fractura (“a breach, fracture, cleft”), from frangere (“to break”), past participle fractus, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrag-, from whence also English break. See fraction.

    From Wiktionary