Reduce meaning

rĭ-do͝os, -dyo͝os
To lower the price of.

The store has drastically reduced winter coats.

verb
34
13
To bring down, as in extent, amount, or degree; diminish.
verb
30
19
To decrease the viscosity of (paint, for example), as by adding a solvent.
verb
24
14
To thicken or intensify the flavor of (a sauce, for example) by slow boiling.
verb
22
16
To put in a simpler or more systematic form; simplify or codify.

Reduced her ideas to a collection of maxims.

verb
18
15
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To become diminished.
verb
5
4
To turn into powder; pulverize.
verb
5
7
To reduce is to make something smaller or to become or feel smaller, or forcing someone into a less desirable position.

When you sell off half of your doll collection, your actions are an example of reduce.

An example of reduce is when your stomach gets smaller because you are on a diet; your stomach reduces.

An example of reduce is when you insult someone and make him feel inferior.

An example of reduce is when you are starving and you have no choice but to steal food- you are forced into or reduced to stealing.

verb
4
1
To simplify the form of (an expression, such as a fraction) without changing the value.
verb
4
1
To boil (a liquid) in order to decrease the volume and concentrate the flavors.
verb
4
2
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To bring down the size, quantity, quality, value or intensity of something; to diminish, to lower, to impair.
verb
3
3
To become reduced.
verb
2
2
To lose weight, as by dieting.
verb
2
2
To bring down, as in extent, amount, or degree; diminish.
verb
2
2
To undergo meiosis.
verb
2
2
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(intransitive) To lose weight.
verb
2
2
To bring to an inferior rank; to degrade, to demote.
verb
2
2
To humble; to conquer; to subdue; to capture.
verb
2
2
To bring to an inferior state or condition.
verb
2
2
To bring to a humbler, weaker, difficult, or forced state or condition; especially:
  • To gain control of; subject or conquer.
  • To subject to destruction.
    Enemy bombers reduced the city to rubble.
  • To bring to a specified undesirable state, as of weakness or helplessness.
    Disease that reduced the patient to emaciation; teasing that reduced the child to tears.
  • To compel to desperate acts.
    The Depression reduced many to begging on street corners.
  • To lower in rank or grade; demote.
verb
2
3
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To lose weight, as by dieting.
verb
2
3
To undergo meiosis.
verb
2
3
To break up into constituent elements by analysis.
verb
2
3
To lower, as in rank or position; demote; downgrade.
verb
2
3
(medicine) To perform a reduction; to restore a fracture or dislocation to the correct alignment.
verb
2
3
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To restore (a fractured or displaced body part) to a normal condition or position.
verb
2
4
To pronounce (a stressed vowel) as the unstressed version of that vowel or as schwa.
verb
2
4
(chemistry) To add electrons / hydrogen or to remove oxygen.
verb
1
0
(metallurgy) To produce metal from ore by removing nonmetallic elements in a smelter.
verb
1
0
(mathematics) To simplify an equation or formula without changing its value.
verb
1
0
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To bring into a certain order; systematize.
verb
1
1
To change in denomination or form without changing in value.

To reduce fractions to their lowest terms.

verb
1
1
To articulate (a vowel) in a central position, giving it a neutral quality, as in an unstressed syllable.
verb
1
1
(cooking) To decrease the liquid content of food by boiling much of its water off.
verb
1
1
(law) To convert to written form (Usage note: this verb almost always take the phrase "to writing").
verb
1
1
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To weaken or lower the density of (a negative or print) by removing metallic silver.
verb
0
0
To restore (a broken bone, displaced organ, etc.) to normal position or condition.
verb
0
0
To restore a fractured or displaced body part to a normal condition or position.
verb
0
0

Origin of reduce

  • Middle English reducen to bring back from Old French reducier from Latin redūcere re- re- dūcere to lead deuk- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Latin redÅ«cere, present active infinitive of redÅ«cō (“reduce"); from re- (“back"), + dÅ«cō (“lead"). See duke, and compare with redoubt.

    From Wiktionary