Abridge meaning

ə-brĭj
The definition of abridge is to reduce or condense the size or scope.

An example of abridge is to shorten a novel to record it as an audio book.

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To reduce the length of (a written text); condense.

The editor abridged the manuscript by cutting out two chapters.

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To limit; curtail.

An unconstitutional law that abridged the rights of citizens.

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To reduce in scope, extent, etc.; shorten.
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To shorten (a piece of writing) while preserving its substance; condense.
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To lessen or curtail (rights, authority, etc.)
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To deprive (a person) of rights, privileges, etc.
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To diminish, lessen, or restrict a legal right.
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To condense or shorten the whole of something, such as a book, and not merely a portion of it.
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(archaic) To deprive; to cut off. [First attested from around (1150 to 1350)]
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(archaic, rare) To debar from. [First attested from around (1150 to 1350)]
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To make shorter; to shorten in duration or extent. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470)]
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To shorten or contract by using fewer words, yet retaining the sense; to epitomize; to condense; as, to abridge a history or dictionary. [First attested in 1384.]. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470)]
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Cut short; truncate. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470)]
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To curtail. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470)]

He had his rights abridged by the crooked sherrif.

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Origin of abridge

  • Middle English abregen from Old French abregier from Late Latin abbreviāre to shorten abbreviate

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English abreggen (“curtail, lessen”), abregge, abrigge, from Old French abregier abreger, from Late Latin abbrevio (“make brief”), from Latin ad + brēvio (“shorten”).

    From Wiktionary