Rupture meaning

rŭpchər
To break open; burst.
verb
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A tear in an organ or a tissue.
noun
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The act of breaking apart or bursting, or the state of being broken apart or burst; breach.
noun
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The definition of a rupture is an instance where something bursts or suddenly breaks.

An example of a rupture is a situation where an artery has broken open suddenly.

An example of a rupture is when two countries stop having friendly relations.

noun
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To affect with, undergo, or suffer a rupture.
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The process of breaking open or bursting.
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A burst, split, or break.
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A social breach or break, between individuals or groups.
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(medicine) A break or tear in soft tissue, such as a muscle.
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(engineering) A failure mode in which a tough ductile material pulls apart rather than cracking.
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(intransitive) To burst, break through, or split, as under pressure.
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To rupture is to break or burst, or to cause to break or burst.

An example of rupture is when a pipe bursts.

verb
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An instance of breaking open or bursting.

A rupture in the fuel line.

noun
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A break in friendly relations.
noun
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To cause to undergo or suffer a rupture.

The accident ruptured his spleen.

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To undergo or suffer a rupture.

The blister ruptured. Their friendship ruptured.

verb
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A hernia, especially of the groin or intestines.
noun
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A breaking off of friendly or peaceful relations, as between countries or individuals.
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(med.) A hernia.
  • An abdominal or inguinal hernia.
  • A forcible tearing or bursting of an organ or part, as of a blood vessel, the bladder, etc.
noun
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To break apart or burst.
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Origin of rupture

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin ruptūra from ruptus past participle of rumpere to break reup- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French rupture, or its source, Latin ruptura (“a breaking, rupture (of a limb or vein), in Medieval Latin also a road, a field, a form of feudal tenure, a tax, etc."), from the participle stem of rumpere (“to break, burst").

    From Wiktionary