Rend meaning

rĕnd
To rend is to tear something into pieces, to wrench something violently or to cause great emotional pain.

When you rip up a piece of fabric into multiple pieces, this is an example of a time when you rend the fabric.

When you yank money out of your friend's hands despite his protests, this is an example of a time when you rend the money.

When you leave your girlfriend broken hearted after you dump her, this is an example of a time when you rend her emotions.

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To tear, pull, or rip with violence.
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To tear, pull apart, rip up, or split with violence [a tree rent by lightning]

A roar rends the air.

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To become torn or split; come apart.

A hole where the seam rends.

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To tear (one's clothing) to show grief, anguish, etc.
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To tear; burst; split apart.
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To separate into parts with force or sudden violence; to tear asunder; to split; to burst.

Powder rends a rock in blasting.

Lightning rends an oak.

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To part or tear off forcibly; to take away by force.
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(intransitive) To be rent or torn; to become parted; to separate; to split.

Relationships may rend if tempers flare.

Rending of garments for shiva is a Jewish tradition.

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To pull away forcibly; wrest.

Rent the money from his hand.

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Origin of rend

  • Middle English renden from Old English rendan

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English renden, from Old English rendan (“to rend, tear, cut, lacerate, cut down"), from Proto-Germanic *hrandijanÄ… (“to tear"), of uncertain origin. Believed by some to be the causitive of Proto-Germanic *hrindanÄ… (“to push"), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱret-, *kret- (“to hit, beat"), in which case would relate it to Old English hrindan (“to thrust, push"). Cognate with Scots rent (“to rend, tear"), Old Frisian renda (“to tear").

    From Wiktionary