Disrupt meaning

dĭs-rŭpt'
To disrupt is to break up or disturb something’s course.

An example of to disrupt is for the protestors to stop the city council meeting.

verb
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To interrupt or impede the progress of.

Our efforts in the garden were disrupted by an early frost. The noise disrupted my nap.

verb
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To throw into confusion or disorder.

Protesters disrupted the candidate's speech.

verb
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To break apart or alter so as to prevent normal or expected functioning.

Radiation that disrupts DNA and kills bacteria.

verb
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To break apart; split up; rend asunder.
verb
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To disturb or interrupt the orderly course of (a social affair, meeting, etc.)
verb
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Hecklers disrupted the man's speech.

verb
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Work on the tunnel was disrupted by a strike.

verb
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To improve a product or service in ways that displaces an established one and surprises the market.

The internet makes it easier for leaner businesses to disrupt the larger and more unwieldy ones.

verb
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(obsolete) Torn off or torn asunder; severed; disrupted.
adjective
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Origin of disrupt

  • Latin disrumpere disrupt- to break apart dis- dis- rumpere to break apart reup- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Latin disruptus, from disrumpere, commonly dirumpere (“to break or burst asunder”), from dis-, di- (“apart, asunder”) + rumpere (“to break”).
    From Wiktionary