Arrange meaning

ə-rānj
The definition of arrange is to put things in a certain order, form or design.

To alphabetize files is an example of arrange.

verb
7
2
To put into a specific order or relation; dispose.

Arrange shoes in a neat row.

verb
5
1
To plan or prepare for.

Arrange a picnic.

verb
5
1
Arrange is defined as to handle the details of an event, or to plan or cause some event to happen.

To organize a wedding is an example of arrange.

To plan a meeting in the park is an example of arrange.

verb
4
0
To bring about or come to an agreement concerning; settle.

Have the bride and groom arranged the date of the wedding?

verb
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0
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To come to an agreement.

Arrange with a friend for a ride to work.

verb
1
0
To adapt or rework (a composition) for other instruments or voices or as another style of performance.
verb
0
0
To cause something to happen or make plans for something to happen.

Arrange for a big wedding.

verb
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To put in the correct, proper, or suitable order.
verb
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0
To sort systematically; classify.
verb
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0
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To make ready; prepare or plan.

To arrange a program of entertainment.

verb
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To arrive at an agreement about; settle.
verb
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0
To write arrangements, esp. as a profession.
verb
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0
To set up, to organize, especially in a positive manner.
verb
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0
To put in order, to organize.
verb
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To plan; to prepare in advance.

To arrange to meet; to arrange for supper.

verb
0
1
(music) To prepare and adapt an already written composition for presentation in other than its original form.
verb
0
1
To adapt (a composition) to other instruments or voices than those for which it was written, or to the style of a certain band or orchestra.
verb
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2
To come to an agreement (with a person, about a thing)
verb
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2
To make plans; prepare.

Arrange to be here later.

verb
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2
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Origin of arrange

  • Middle English arengen from Old French arengier a- to (from Latin ad- ad–) rengier to put in a line (from reng rank (of warriors), line) (of Germanic origin sker-2 in Indo-European roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English arengen, arrangen (“to draw up a battle line”) from Old French arengier, arrangier (“to put in a line, put in a row”) from reng, rang, ranc (“line, row, rank”), from Frankish hring (“ring”), from Proto-Germanic *hringaz (“something bent or curved”), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker- (“to bend, turn”). Akin to Old High German (h)ring, Old Frisian hring, Old English hring, hrincg (“ring”), Old Norse hringr (“ring, circle, queue, sword; ship”). More at ring

    From Wiktionary