Breach meaning

brēch
To make a hole or gap in; break through.
verb
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A broken or torn place or part.
noun
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A breaking of waves over or upon a ship, sea wall, etc.
noun
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To break or violate (a contract, covenant, etc.)
verb
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The definition of a breach is a break, or violation.

An example of a breach is an agreement that has been broken.

An example of a breach is a person violating their probation.

noun
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Breach is defined as break or violate.

An example of breach is breaking a hole in the sea wall.

An example of breach is breaking a contract.

verb
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To break or violate (an agreement, for example).
verb
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The failure to perform a legal or moral obligation owed to a person or to the public.
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The failure to exercise the care that a reasonable person would exercise in the same or similar situation.
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The breaking of waves or surf.
noun
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A violation or infraction, as of a contract, law, legal obligation, or promise.
noun
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A breaking up or disruption of friendly relations; an estrangement.
noun
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A leap of a whale from the water.
noun
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To leap from the water.

Waiting for the whale to breach.

verb
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To develop a hole or opening. Used especially of protective embankments.

The rising river caused the levee to breach.

verb
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(obs.) A breaking or being broken.
noun
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A failure to observe the terms, as of a law or promise, the customary forms, etc.; violation; infraction.
noun
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A whale's leap clear of the water.
noun
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A break in friendly relations.
noun
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To make a breach in; break open or through.
verb
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A violation of a law, obligation, or promise.
noun
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The common law trespass of entering another’s land either unlawfully or without authorization.
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The failure to act as required by the law.
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The failure of a fiduciary to fulfill his duties with a high standard of care.
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. The criminal offense of provoking violence, creating a public disturbance, or engaging in public conduct that offends public morals or undermines public safety. See also bond.
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A common law action for breaking off a marriage engagement. Abolished in many states.
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The breach by a trustee of the terms of a trust or of her general fiduciary duties.
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A violation of an express or implied agreement or warranty relating to the title, quality, content, or condition of goods sold or of goods delivered to a bailee.
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A gap or opening made by breaking or battering, as in a wall, fortification or levee; the space between the parts of a solid body rent by violence; a break; a rupture; a fissure.
noun
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A breaking up of amicable relations, a falling-out.
noun
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A breaking of waters, as over a vessel or a coastal defence; the waters themselves; surge; surf.

A clear breach is when the waves roll over the vessel without breaking. A clean breach is when everything on deck is swept away.

noun
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A breaking out upon; an assault.
noun
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(archaic) A bruise; a wound.
noun
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(archaic) A hernia; a rupture.
noun
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(law) A breaking or infraction of a law, or of any obligation or tie; violation; non-fulfillment; as, a breach of contract; a breach of promise.
noun
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(figuratively) A difference in opinions, social class etc.
noun
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The act of breaking, in a figurative sense.
noun
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To make a breach in.

They breached the outer wall, but not the main one.

verb
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To violate or break.
verb
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(nautical, of the sea) To break into a ship or into a coastal defence.
verb
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(intransitive, of a whale) To leap clear out of the water.
verb
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An opening made by a breakthrough, as in a wall, line of defense, etc.
noun
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To leap clear of the water.
verb
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Origin of breach

  • Middle English breche from Old English brēc bhreg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English breche, from Old English briċe, bryċe (“breach, fracture, breaking, infringement; fragment”), from Proto-Germanic *brukiz (“breach, fissure”), from Proto-Germanic *brukōną, *brekaną (“to break”). Cognate with Scots breach, breiche, bretch, breack (“breach”), Saterland Frisian breeke (“breach, break”), Dutch breuk (“breach”), German Bruch (“breach”). More at break.

    From Wiktionary