Offend meaning

ə-fĕnd
To result in displeasure.

Bad manners may offend.

verb
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To offend is to do something offensive to someone, or to break a civil or religious law.

An example of to offend is to say a curse word to someone who doesn’t like them.

An example of to offend is to steal from your neighbor.

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To cause displeasure, anger, resentment, or wounded feelings in.

We were offended by his tasteless jokes.

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To be displeasing or disagreeable to.

Onions offend my sense of smell.

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To break a law, religious commandment, etc.; commit a sin or crime.
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To create resentment, anger, or displeasure; give offense.
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To hurt the feelings of; cause to feel resentful, angry, or displeased; insult.
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To be displeasing to (the taste, sense, etc.)
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To hurt the feelings of; to displease; to make angry; to insult.

Your accusations offend me deeply.

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(intransitive) To feel or become offended, take insult.

Don't worry. I don't offend easily.

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To physically harm, pain.

Strong light offends the eye.

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To annoy, cause discomfort or resent.

Physically enjoyable frivolity can still offend the conscience.

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(intransitive) To sin, transgress divine law or moral rules.
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To transgress or violate a law or moral requirement.
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New Testament, Matthew 5:29 (Sermon on the Mount),

"If thine eye offend thee, pluck it out."

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Origin of offend

  • Middle English offenden from Old French offendre from Latin offendere gwhen- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin offendō (“strike, blunder, commit an offense"), from ob (“to") + *fendō (“strike").

    From Wiktionary