Shock meaning

shŏk
To come together violently; collide.
verb
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The definition of a shock is a sudden powerful disturbance, shake or blow.

An example of a shock is the electrical jolt felt when taking a polyester shirt out of the dryer.

An example of a shock is the sudden movement of an earthquake.

An example of a shock is the sudden death of someone.

noun
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To produce electrical shock in (a body)
verb
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A shock absorber.
noun
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To surprise and disturb greatly.

We were shocked by his admission of wrongdoing.

verb
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To induce a state of physical shock in (an animal or person).
verb
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A number of sheaves of grain stacked upright in a field for drying.
noun
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A thick heavy mass.

A shock of white hair.

noun
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To disturb the mind or emotions of; affect with great surprise, distress, disgust, etc.
verb
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To affect with physical shock.
verb
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A pile of grain sheaves, as of corn or wheat, stacked together on end to cure and dry.
noun
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A massive, acute physiological reaction usually to physical trauma, infection, or allergy, characterized by a marked loss of blood pressure, resulting in a diminished blood flow to body tissues and a rapid heart rate.
noun
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To come into contact violently, as in battle; collide.
verb
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To gather (grain) into shocks.
verb
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The impact of persons, forces, etc. in combat or collision.
noun
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An extreme stimulation of the nerves, muscles, etc. accompanying the passage of electric current through the body.
noun
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noun
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A disorder resulting from ineffective circulation of the blood, produced by hemorrhage, severe infection, disturbance of heart function, etc., and characterized by a marked decrease in blood pressure, a weak, rapid pulse, decreased kidney function, etc.
noun
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To be shocked, distressed, disgusted, etc.

She doesn't shock easily.

verb
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Of or characterized by content that is intentionally shocking, offensive, vulgar, etc.

Shock art, shock radio.

adjective
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To gather and pile in shocks.
verb
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Bushy or shaggy, as hair.
adjective
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A massive, acute physiological reaction usually to physical trauma, infection, or allergy, characterized by a marked loss of blood pressure, resulting in a diminished blood flow to body tissues and a rapid heart rate.
noun
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The sensation and muscular spasm caused by an electric current passing through the body or a body part.
noun
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To induce a state of physical shock in an animal or person.
verb
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An instance of the passage of an electric current through the body. The amount of injury caused by electric shock depends on the type and strength of the current, the length of time the current is applied, and the route the current takes once it enters the body.
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A life-threatening condition marked by a severe drop in blood pressure, resulting from serious injury or illness.
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Sudden, heavy impact.
  • (figuratively) Something so surprising that it is stunning.
  • Electric shock, a sudden burst of electric energy, hitting an animate animal such as a human.
  • Circulatory shock, a life-threatening medical emergency characterized by the inability of the circulatory system to supply enough oxygen to meet tissue requirements.
  • A sudden or violent mental or emotional disturbance.

The train hit the buffers with a great shock.

noun
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(mathematics) A discontinuity arising in the solution of a partial differential equation.
noun
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To cause to be emotionally shocked.

The disaster shocked the world.

verb
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To give an electric shock.
verb
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An arrangement of sheaves for drying, a stook.
noun
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(commerce, dated) A lot consisting of sixty pieces; a term applied in some Baltic ports to loose goods.
noun
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(by extension) A tuft or bunch of something (e.g. hair, grass)

A head covered with a shock of sandy hair.

noun
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To collect, or make up, into a shock or shocks; to stook.

To shock rye.

verb
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A violent collision, impact, or explosion, or the force or movement resulting from this.

The shock of the explosion blew out windows of every building on the street.

noun
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The sensation and muscular spasm caused by an electric current passing through the body or a body part.
noun
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A sudden economic disturbance, such as a rise in the price of a commodity.
noun
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A thick, bushy or tangled mass, as of hair.
noun
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Origin of shock

  • French choc from choquer to collide with from Old French chuquier perhaps of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English shok

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle Dutch schokken (“to push, jolt, shake, jerk") or Middle French choquer (“to collide with, clash"), from Old Dutch *skokkan (“to shake up and down, shog"), from Proto-Germanic *skukkanÄ… (“to move, shake, tremble"). Of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to Proto-Germanic *skakanÄ… (“to shake, stir"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kAg'-, *(s)keg- (“to shake, stir"); see shake. Cognate with Middle Low German schocken (“collide with, deliver a blow to, move back and forth"), Old High German scoc (“a jolt, swing"), Middle High German schocken (German schaukeln, “to swing"), Old Norse skykkr (“vibration, surging motion"), Icelandic skykkjun (“tremuously"), Middle English schiggen (“to shake"). More at shog.

    From Wiktionary