Mass meaning

măs
The body of common people or people of low socioeconomic status.
noun
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To gather or be gathered into a mass.
verb
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Of, relating to, characteristic of, directed at, or attended by a large number of people.

Mass education; mass communication.

adjective
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The physical volume or bulk of a solid body.
noun
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A lump or aggregate of coherent material.

A cancerous mass.

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A property of matter equal to the measure of the amount of matter contained in or constituting a physical body that partly determines the body's resistance to changes in the speed or direction of its motion. The mass of an object is not dependent on gravity and therefore is different from but proportional to its weight.
noun
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Total; complete.

The mass result is impressive.

adjective
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A musical setting of certain parts of the Mass, especially the Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, and Agnus Dei.
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Massachusetts.
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A quantity of matter forming a body of indefinite shape and size, usually of relatively large size; lump.
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A large quantity or number.

A mass of bruises.

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Bulk; size; magnitude.
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The main or larger part; majority.
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A large area or form of one color, shade, intensity, etc.
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The paste or plastic combination of drugs from which pills are made.
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The quantity of matter in a body as measured by its inertia; the ratio of force to the acceleration produced by that force: the gravitational force on an object is proportional to its mass.
noun
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Of, characteristic of, or for the masses.

Mass media.

adjective
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To gather or form into a mass.
verb
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The Roman Catholic Eucharistic rite consisting of prayers and ceremonies centered on the consecration of bread and wine as a real though mystical reenactment of the sacrifice of Christ on the cross: with differing doctrinal interpretations, the term has sometimes been used of the Eucharistic rite of other denominations.
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A musical setting for certain parts of this rite.
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Massachusetts.
abbreviation
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A lump or aggregate of coherent material.

A cancerous mass.

noun
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A thick, pasty mixture containing drugs from which pills are formed.
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A measure of the amount of matter contained in or constituting a physical body. In classical mechanics, the mass of an object is related to the force required to accelerate it and hence is related to its inertia , and is essential to Newton's laws of motion . Objects that have mass interact with each other through the force of gravity . In Special Relativity, the observed mass of an object is dependent on its velocity with respect to the observer, with higher velocity entailing higher observed mass. Mass is measured in many different units; in most scientific applications, the SI unit of kilogram is used.
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(physical) Matter, material.
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(physics) The quantity of matter which a body contains, irrespective of its bulk or volume. It is one of four fundamental properties of matter. It is measured in kilograms in the SI system of measurement.
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(pharmacy) A medicinal substance made into a cohesive, homogeneous lump, of consistency suitable for making pills; as, blue mass.
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(medicine) A palpable or visible abnormal globular structure; a tumor.
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(bodybuilding) Excess body weight, especially in the form of muscle hypertrophy.
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A large quantity; a sum.
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(quantity) Large in number.
  • The principal part; the main body.
  • A large body of individuals, especially persons.
    The mass of spectators didn't see the infraction on the field.
    A mass of ships converged on the beaches of Dunkirk.
  • (in the plural) The lower classes of persons.
    The masses are revolting.
noun
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To form or collect into a mass; to form into a collective body; to bring together into masses; to assemble.
verb
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(intransitive) To have a certain mass.

I mass 70 kilograms.

verb
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Involving a mass of things; cencerning a large quantity or number.

There is evidence of mass extinctions in the distant past.

adjective
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Involving a mass of people; of, for, or by the masses.

Mass unemployment resulted from the financial collapse.

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(religion) The Eucharist, now especially in Roman Catholicism.
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(religion) Celebration of the Eucharist.
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(religion, usually as the Mass) The sacrament of the Eucharist.
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A musical setting of parts of the mass.
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(intransitive, obsolete) To celebrate mass.

verb
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(Roman Catholic Church) The principal liturgical service of the Church, including a scripture service and a eucharistic service, which includes the consecration and oblation (offering) of the host and wine. One of the seven sacraments.
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A similar ceremony offered by a number of Christian sects.
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(music) A musical composition set to portions of the Mass.
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The definition of mass is the Liturgy of the Eucharist or a body of matter or a large amount of people or things.

An example of mass is a Roman Catholic church service.

An example of mass is a pile of clay.

An example of mass is a gathering of thousands of people.

noun
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A unified body of matter with no specific shape.

A mass of clay.

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A grouping of individual parts or elements that compose a unified body of unspecified size or quantity.
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A large but nonspecific amount or number.

A mass of bruises.

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The principal part; the majority.

The mass of the continent.

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An area of unified light, shade, or color in a painting.
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A thick, pasty mixture containing drugs from which pills are formed.
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Done or carried out on a large scale.

Mass production.

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in the mass
  • Collectively; as a whole.
idiom
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the masses
  • The great mass of common people; specif., the working people, or the lower classes in the social order.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

in the mass
the masses

Origin of mass

  • Middle English masse from Old English mæsse from Vulgar Latin messa from Late Latin missa from Latin feminine past participle of mittere to send away, dismiss

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English masse from Old French from Latin massa from Greek māza, maza mag- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English masse, messe, Old English mæsse. Late Latin missa, from Latin mittere, missum, to send, dismiss: compare French messe. In the ancient churches, the public services at which the catechumens were permitted to be present were called missa catechumenorum, ending with the reading of the Gospel. Then they were dismissed with these words: "Ite, missa est", the congregation is dismissed. After that the sacrifice proper began. At its close the same words were said to those who remained. So the word gave the name of Mass to the sacrifice in the Catholic Church. Compare Christmas, Lammas, Mess a dish, Missal

    From Wiktionary

  • In late Middle English (circa 1400) as masse in the sense of "lump, quantity of matter", from Anglo-Norman masse, in Old French attested from the 11th century, via late Latin massa (“lump, dough"), from Ancient Greek μᾶζα (maza, “barley-cake, lump (of dough)"). The Greek noun is derived from the verb μάσσω (mássō, “to knead"), ultimately from a Proto-Indo-European *mag'- (“to oil, knead"). The sense of "a large number or quantity" arises circa 1580. The scientific sense is from 1687 (as Latin massa) in the works of Isaac Newton, with the first English use (as mass) occurring in 1704.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English masse, from Old English mæsse (“the mass, church festival"), from Vulgar Latin *messa, from Late Latin missa, noun use of feminine past participle of classical Latin mittere (“to send"). Compare Dutch mis (“mass"), German Messe (“mass"), Danish messe (“mass"), Icelandic messa (“mass"). More at mission.

    From Wiktionary