Mob meaning

mŏb
A flock or herd of animals.
noun
6
3
To crowd around and jostle or annoy, especially in anger or excessive enthusiasm.

Eager fans mobbed the popular singer.

verb
3
2
Mother of the bride.
abbreviation
3
2
A large and often disorderly crowd.
noun
2
2
To mob is defined as to crowd into or to fill with a lot of people.

An example of to mob is for hundreds of people to race into a store all at once.

verb
2
3
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To crowd around and attack.
verb
1
0
The definition of a mob is a large and often unruly crowd.

An example of a mob is hundreds of people waiting outside of a store to shop on Black Friday.

noun
1
1
An indiscriminate or loosely associated group of things.

A mob of boats in the harbor.

noun
1
1
To crowd into.

Visitors mobbed the fairgrounds.

verb
1
1
A criminal organization, especially the Mafia operating in the United States.
noun
1
2
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To crowd around and jostle, annoy, etc., as in curiosity or anger.
verb
0
0
To fill with many people; throng.
verb
0
0
An unruly group of people.
noun
0
0
A commonly used collective noun for animals such as horses or cattle.
noun
0
0
The Mafia, or a similar group that engages in organized crime (preceded by the).
noun
0
0
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(video games) A non-player character that exists to be fought or killed to further the progression of the story or game.
noun
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0
(archaic) The lower classes of a community; the rabble.
noun
0
0
To crowd around (someone), often with hostility.

The fans mobbed a well-dressed couple who resembled their idols.

verb
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0
To crowd into or around a place.

The shoppers mobbed the store on the first day of the sale.

verb
0
0
(video games) The act of a player aggroing enemies so they follow them and gather, forming a mob of foes.
verb
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0
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A mob cap.

noun
0
0
To wrap up in, or cover with, a cowl.
verb
0
0
Mobile phone.
abbreviation
0
0
A disorderly and lawless crowd; rabble.
noun
0
1
Any crowd.
noun
0
1
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The masses; common people collectively.
noun
0
1
The mass of common people; the populace.
noun
0
2

Origin of mob

  • Short for mobile from Latin mōbile (vulgus) fickle (crowd) neuter of mōbilis mobile
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English, short for mobile, from Latin mōbile (vulgus) (“fickle (crowd)"). The video-gaming sense originates from English mobile, used by Richard Bartle for objects capable of movement in an early MUD.
    From Wiktionary
  • Abbreviation of mobile phone.
    From Wiktionary
  • Alteration of mab.
    From Wiktionary