Ruck definition

rŭk
A crease or pucker, as in cloth.
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Crease, fold, wrinkle, or pucker.
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To crease or fold.
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A crease, a wrinkle, a pucker, as on fabric.
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To make a fold in; crease.
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To become creased.
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A multitude; a throng.
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The undistinguished crowd or ordinary run of persons or things.
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A play in Rugby in which a mass of players gathers around a ball dropped by a tackled ball carrier, with each player attempting to gain possession of the ball by kicking it to a teammate.
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The mass of players during such a play.
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A large quantity, mass, or crowd.
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The horses left behind by the leaders in a race.
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The multitude or mass of undistinguished, ordinary people or things; common run.
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A throng or crowd of people or things; a mass, a pack. [from 16th c.]
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(Australian Rules Football) Contesting a bounce or ball up; used appositionally in "ruck contest". Rucks also used collectively either of ruckmen or of ruckmen and ruck rovers, and occasionally used in place of "followers" (including rovers too). [from 19th c.]
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(rugby union) The situation formed when a runner is brought to ground and one or more members of each side are engaged above the ball, trying to win possession of it; a loose scrum. [from 20th c.]
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(obsolete) To act as a ruckman in a stoppage in Australian Rules football.
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(intransitive) To become folded.
  • 1917 "Will you come over now and try on your dress?" Ally asked, looking at her with wistful admiration. "I want to be sure the sleeves don't ruck up the same as they did yesterday." — Edith Wharton, Summer, Chapter 12.
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(UK, dialect, obsolete) To cower or huddle together; to squat; to sit, as a hen on eggs.

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Obsolete form of roc.

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People who are followers, not leaders.
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(archaic) A heap or stack, as of fuel.
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The common mass of people or things; the ordinary ranks. [from 19th c.]
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Origin of ruck

  • Ultimately from Old Norse hrukka wrinkle, fold sker-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English ruke heap probably of Scandinavian origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • 1780, from Old Norse hrukka (“wrinkle, crease”), from Proto-Germanic *hrunkijō, *hrunkitō (“fold, wrinkle”), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ker- (“to turn, bend”). Akin to Icelandic hrukka (“wrinkle, crease, ruck”), Old High German runza (“fold, wrinkle, crease”), German Runzel (“wrinkle”), Middle Dutch ronse (“frown”). More at frounce.

    From Wiktionary

  • Compare Danish ruge (“to brood, to hatch”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Wiktionary