Ply meaning

plī
To use diligently; wield.

Ply a knitting needle.

verb
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The definition of a ply is a layer of fabric, wood or a strand of fiber.

An example of a ply is a layer of wood glued into a sheet of plywood.

An example of a ply is a three-ply cashmere sweater which is a sweater knit from triple strands of cashmere.

noun
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To traverse or sail over regularly.

Trading ships plied the routes between coastal ports.

verb
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To traverse a route or course regularly.

The boat plies between the islands on a weekly schedule.

verb
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A bias; an inclination.
noun
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A layer of rubber-coated fabric, often of nylon or polyester cords, forming the body of an automobile tire.
noun
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One of the strands twisted together to make yarn, rope, or thread. Often used in combination.

Three-ply cord.

noun
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To engage in diligently; practice.

Plied the carpenter's trade.

verb
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(now rare) To bend, twist, fold, or mold.
verb
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Ply is defined as to make multiple layers, to work at, to keep supplying or to keep asking questions.

An example of ply is to stack thin sheets of wood together to make plywood.

An example of ply is to use your skills at a job, to ply your craft.

An example of ply is to keep giving snacks to a group of teens to keep them motivated to complete a project, to ply them with snacks.

An example of ply is to continually ask questions of someone, to ply them with questions.

verb
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To join together, as by molding or twisting.
verb
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To double over (cloth, for example).
verb
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A layer, as of doubled-over cloth or of paperboard.
noun
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To continue offering something to (someone); ensure that (someone) is abundantly served.

Plied their guests with excellent food.

verb
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To ask questions or make requests of (someone) insistently.
verb
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(obs.) To bend or submit.
verb
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A single thickness, fold, or layer, as of doubled cloth, plywood, etc.
noun
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One of the twisted strands in rope, yarn, etc.
noun
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Having (a specified number of) layers, thicknesses, or strands.

Three-ply.

adjective
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To do work with; wield or use (a tool, faculty, etc.), esp. with energy.
verb
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To work at (a trade)
verb
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To address (someone) urgently and constantly (with questions, etc.)
verb
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To keep supplying (with gifts, food, drink, etc.) in a persistent way.
verb
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To sail regularly back and forth across.

Boats ply the channel.

verb
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To keep busy or work (at something or with a tool, etc.)
verb
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To travel regularly (between places)
verb
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(old poet.) To steer a course.
verb
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A layer of material. (two-ply toilet paper)
noun
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A strand that, twisted together with other strands, makes up yarn or rope.
noun
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(colloquial) Plywood.
noun
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(artificial intelligence, game theory) In two-player sequential games, a "half-turn", or one move made by one of the players.

He proposed to build Deep Purple, a super-computer capable of 24-ply look-ahead for chess.

noun
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(now chiefly Scotland) State, condition.
noun
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To bend; to fold.
verb
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(intransitive) To flex.
verb
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He plied his trade as carpenter for forty-three years.

verb
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(intransitive) To work diligently.
verb
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To use vigorously.

He plied his ax with bloody results.

verb
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To travel over regularly.

Ply the seven seas.

A steamer plies between certain ports.

verb
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To persist in offering.

She plied him with liquor.

verb
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To press upon; to urge importunately.

To ply one with questions, with solicitations, or with drink.

verb
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To employ diligently; to use steadily.
verb
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(nautical) To work to windward; to beat.
verb
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One of the sheets of wood glued together to form plywood.
noun
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To perform or work diligently or regularly.

Plied at the weaver's trade for 20 years.

verb
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(nautical) To work against the wind by a zigzag course; tack.
verb
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Origin of ply

  • Middle English plien from Old French plier alteration of pleier from Latin plicāre to fold plek- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English plien from applien to apply apply

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Middle French pli (“pleat, fold"), from plier (“bend, fold"), from Latin plico (“fold, fold together")

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English plien (“bend, fold, mold"), from Middle French plier (“bend, fold"), see Etymololgy 1.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English plien, short for applien (“apply")

    From Wiktionary