Fold meaning

fōld
To be or become folded.
verb
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A hollow; small valley.
noun
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To envelop or clasp; enfold.

Folded his children to his breast; folded the check into the letter.

verb
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To blend (a light ingredient) into a heavier mixture with a series of gentle turns.

Folded the beaten egg whites into the batter.

verb
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To form bends in (a stratum of rock).
verb
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To close, especially for lack of financial success; fail.
verb
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To withdraw from a game in defeat.
verb
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The act or an instance of folding.
noun
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A part that has been folded over or against another.

The loose folds of the drapery; clothes stacked in neat folds.

noun
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A line or mark made by folding; a crease.

Tore the paper carefully along the fold; a headline that appeared above the fold.

noun
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A coil or bend, as of rope.
noun
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A hill or dale in undulating country.
noun
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A bend in a stratum of rock.
noun
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A crease or ridge apparently formed by folding, as of a membrane; a plica.
noun
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A fenced enclosure for livestock, especially sheep.
noun
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A flock of sheep.
noun
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To place or keep (sheep, for example) in a fenced enclosure.
verb
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Having a specified number of parts.

A threefold plan for fighting poverty.

suffix
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Having a specified number of parts.

A threefold plan for fighting poverty.

suffix
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To draw together and intertwine.

To fold the arms.

verb
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To draw (wings) close to the body.
verb
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To clasp in the arms; embrace.
verb
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To wrap up; envelop.
verb
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To fail.
  • To be forced to close, as a business, play, etc.
  • To succumb, as to exhaustion; collapse.
verb
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To withdraw from the betting on a hand, specif. by turning over one's exposed cards.
verb
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A folded part or layer.
noun
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A mark made by folding.
noun
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A hollow or crease produced by folded parts or layers.
noun
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A rock layer folded by pressure.
noun
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A pen in which to keep sheep.
noun
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Sheep kept together; flock of sheep.
noun
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A group or organization with common interests, aims, faith, etc., as a church.
noun
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To keep or confine in a pen.
verb
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Having (a specified number of) parts.

A tenfold division.

affix
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(a specified number of) Times as many, as much, as large.

To profit tenfold.

affix
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A crease or ridge apparently formed by folding, as of a membrane; a plica.
noun
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In the embryo, a transient elevation or reduplication of tissue in the form of a lamina.
noun
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A bend in a layer of rock or in another planar feature such as foliation or the cleavage of a mineral. Folds occur as the result of deformation, usually associated with plate-tectonic forces.
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(1) For foldable phones, see Galaxy Fold and iPhone Fold.
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To bend (any thin material, such as paper) over so that it comes in contact with itself.
verb
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To make the proper arrangement (in a thin material) by bending.
verb
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(dialectal, poetic or obsolete) The Earth; earth; land, country.
noun
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Used to make adjectives meaning times.

There has been a threefold increase in inflation (= inflation is three times what it was before)

suffix
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Used to make adverbs meaning times.

Inflation has increased threefold (= inflation is three times what it was before)

suffix
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The definition of a fold is a crease, something that has been bended or the act of bending one part over another.

An example of a fold is a crease in a piece of construction paper.

noun
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Fold is defined as to bend to bring one part over another.

An example of fold is to create a card from one sheet of paper.

An example of fold is to close up a beach chair.

An example of fold is to cross ones arms.

verb
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To bend over or double up so that one part lies on another part.

Fold a sheet of paper.

verb
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To make compact by doubling or bending over parts.

Folded the laundry; folded the chairs for stacking.

verb
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To bring from an extended to a closed position.

The hawk folded its wings.

verb
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To bring from a compact to an extended position; unfold.

Folded the ironing board down from the wall; folded out the map to see where we were.

verb
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To place together and intertwine.

Fold one's arms.

verb
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fold in
  • To blend (an ingredient) into a mixture, using gentle, cutting strokes.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

fold in

Origin of fold

  • ME -fold, -fald < OE -feald: see fold

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • Middle English folden from Old English fealdan, faldan pel-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English -feald, -fald pel-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English -feald, -fald pel-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English fald

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English fold, fald, from Old English fald, falæd, falod (“fold, stall, stable, cattle-pen”), from Proto-Germanic *faludaz (“enclosure”). Akin to Scots fald, fauld (“an enclosure for livestock”), Dutch vaalt (“dung heap”), Middle Low German valt, vālt (“an inclosed space, a yard”), Danish fold (“pen for herbivorous livestock”), Swedish fålla (“corral, pen, pound”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English, from Old English -feald (“-fold"), from Proto-Germanic *-falþaz (“-fold"), from Proto-Indo-European *-poltos (“-fold"). Cognate with Dutch -voud, German -falt, Swedish -faldig (“-fold"), Latin -plus, -plex, Ancient Greek -παλτος (-paltos), -πλος (-paltos, -plos). More at fold.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English, from Old English folde (“earth, land, country, district, region, territory, ground, soil, clay”), from Proto-Germanic *fuldǭ (“ground, plain”), from Proto-Indo-European *pel- (“field, plain”). Cognate with Norwegian and Icelandic fold (“land, earth, meadow”).

    From Wiktionary