Congregation meaning

kŏng'grĭ-gā'shən
The members of a specific religious group who regularly worship at a church or synagogue.
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The definition of a congregation is a gathering of people, or people who share the same faith and habitually attend the same church.

All of the people who attend a particular church are an example of the church's congregation.

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A group of people gathered for religious worship.
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A religious institute in which only simple vows, not solemn vows, are taken.
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A division of the Curia.
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A congregating or being congregated.
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A gathering of people or things; assemblage.
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An assembly of people for religious worship or teaching.
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The members of a particular place of worship.
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A settlement, town, or parish in the colonies of early New England where Congregationalism was established.
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The whole body or assembly of Israelites.
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Any of certain religious communities following a common rule.
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A division of an order, made up of a group of monasteries.
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A committee, as of cardinals, in charge of some department of church affairs.
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A gathering of faithful in a temple, church, synagogue, mosque or other place of worship. It can also refer to the people who are present at a devotional service in the building, particularly in contrast to the pastor, minister, imam, rabbi etc. and/or choir, who may be seated apart from the general congregation or lead the service (notably in responsary form).
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A Roman Congregation, a main department of the Vatican administration of the universal church.
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A corporate body whose members gather for worship, or the members of such a body.
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Any large gathering of people.
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The collective noun for eagles.
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The act of assembling.
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A body of assembled people or things; a gathering.
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Origin of congregation

From Old French congregacion, from Latin congregātiō, from congregare "to herd together", itself from com- "together" + gregare "to collect into a flock, gather" (from grex "a flock, herd"); adopted c.1340 by the English Bible translator William Tyndale, to render the Greek (ekklesia) ('those called together, (popular) meeting'; hence Latin ecclesia 'church') in his New Testament, and preferred by 16th century Reformers instead of church.